Qoros GQ3 for Geneva

Qoros GQ3 concepts
18 Jan, 2013 5:40pm Tom Phillips

New Chinese car firm Qoros will debut the Skoda Octavia-rivalling GQ3 and two concepts at Geneva

New Chinese car firm Qoros will show Estate and Cross Hybrid crossover concepts at the Geneva Motor Show. The concepts will line-up on the firm’s stand alongside the production version of the firm’s rival to the Skoda Octavia, the Qoros GQ3.

Both concept models are based on the same platform as the GQ3. They were designed by former MINI styling boss, Gert Hildebrand, and preview “future compact hatchback crossover and estate variants.”

The Estate Concept is a more practical version of the GQ3, while the Cross Hybrid concept uses a petrol-hybrid powertrain, which allows for four-wheel drive in limited situations with the engine driving the front wheels and an electric motor driving the rears.

The GQ3 will go on sale in China in mid-2013, with the first cars arriving in Europe later in the year. While initially cold on the idea of selling cars in the UK, Qoros is still evaluating the UK market.

The GQ3 will feature plenty of tech, including an eight-inch central touchscreen which will be fitted as standard and used to control the car’s stereo and sat-nav functions. The infotainment system will also be connected to the Internet, allowing drivers to share their position on various social media platforms.

Like Skoda, the Chinese firm is planning to release a new model every six months as it bids to expand rapidly. The Qoros models will be built at a new factory, currently under construction in China. The plant will have an initial capacity of 150,000, but this can be expanded to 450,000 given sufficient demand.

Qoros was established in 2007, and is a joint venture between Chery Automobile – the firm which also has a joint venture agreement with Jaguar Land Rover to build cars in China – and Israeli holding company Israel Corporation.

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I'm not a fan of 'touchscreens' being used to control the cars functions, when driving I would need to take my eyes off the road to look at the screen and press the right button. With conventional buttons, after a while you know where they are in your car and can press them/use them without looking, I'm not sure that would be the case with a touch screen.

Agree - you can also 'feel' a button so I would say its safer.

R.I.P European carmakers.

AEX 1337
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