BMW X5 (2013-2018) review - MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

Mainstream X5 models won’t break the bank, but you’ll need deep pockets if you’re looking at the faster versions

As far as efficiency is concerned, the xDrive40e hybrid has the best figures on paper. It combines a 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine with an electric motor to deliver not only an impressive total power output, but also claimed 85.6mpg fuel economy and CO2 emissions of only 77g/km, which will be attractive to business users.

If you want to come close to the claimed economy figures, you'll need to plug the car in to charge every time you park it, but even then a diesel might return better overall mpg, depending on the kind of driving you do.

The £51,000-plus price tag of the hybrid will make it a non-starter anyway, and if you want to keep running costs to a minimum, the entry-level sDrive25d model could be the answer. It’s rear-wheel drive, and claims 50.4mpg economy and 149g/km CO2 emissions. 

You can add 4x4, badged xDrive25d, which uses the same 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine to deliver 47.9mpg and 155g/km, but provides the reassurance of total traction. The xDrive30d offers a great balance of power and economy – its 3.0-litre six-cylinder engine has 40bhp more power and 110Nm more torque than the 25d, but efficiency only falls to 45.6mpg and 162g/km.

The xDrive40d is worth considering if you plan to add lots of options, as the cost of these extras drops if you go for the bigger engine. The top-spec M50d and xDrive50i carry similar price tags, and serve up similar performance, while CO2 emissions of just 177g/km mean the M50d is cleaner than the equivalent Range Rover Sport and Porsche Cayenne

The diesel has more torque, but the xDrive50i petrol makes a better noise, and neither will be cheap to run. Don’t expect to get close to their official fuel economy figures if you drive with a heavy right foot.

Unsurprisingly, the X5 M is the thirstiest model in the range, with BMW claiming 25.4mpg economy and 258g/km CO2 emissions.

Insurance groups

It’s big and it’s fast, so the BMW X5 isn’t going to be cheap to insure. Even the entry-level sDrive25d sits in insurance group 41, while the M50d is in group 49 and the X5 M takes you to the top group 50.

These rates pretty much mirror the Porsche Cayenne and Range Rover Sport line-ups, although if you’re in the market for one of these cars, steep annual premiums aren’t likely to put you off.

Depreciation

Depreciation is one of the biggest factors to consider when buying a big luxury car. And our experts suggest that, with predicted residuals of 49.1 per cent, the X5 won’t hold its price as well as its rivals. Over three years, that means the M50d is likely to lose just over £32,000 in value.

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    xDrive30d xLine 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £57,370

Most Economical

  • Name
    xDrive30d MHT xLine 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £58,945

Fastest

  • Name
    xDrive M50i 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £75,485

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