In-depth reviews

Hyundai Ioniq 5 review - Engines, performance and drive

Although set up for comfort, the Ioniq 5 should still be quick enough for most

Hyundai is serious about its all-electric future, with the Korean car maker planning to introduce 23 all-electric models by 2023, and targeting 1 million BEV sales by 2025. The Ioniq 5 sits on the manufacturer’s first dedicated BEV platform called E-GMP, while the new tech will also underpin production of smaller and larger models.

Despite showcasing the company’s latest EV architecture, the Ioniq 5 still incurs the typical weight penalty that comes from housing big, heavy batteries, although its design does allow for the cells to be placed under the floor to help deliver a low centre of gravity. Hyundai’s all-electric hatchback weighs around two tonnes, but performance remains solid, with fierce acceleration off the line in the 301bhp top-spec model if you decide to stamp on the pedal. Otherwise, the power delivery is all very relaxed, with the 5 easy to pilot around town. 

We wouldn’t say the Ioniq 5 is an especially fun car to drive around twisty lanes, as it majors on providing great levels of comfort rather than B-road thrills - a brief it fulfills impressively well. Higher-end cars, fitted with larger 20-inch alloy wheels, provide a little more shuffle over slow-speed lumps and bumps than you’d perhaps like, but overall the 5 offers a composed ride, with limited body roll and the light steering well suited to the car’s set-up

Engines, 0-60 acceleration and top speed 

The Ioniq 5 is available with a choice of two batteries, three power outputs and the option of rear- or all-wheel-drive. Entry-level cars use a 58kWh battery and a 168bhp motor driving the rear wheels, with 0-62mph taking a reasonable 8.5 seconds. Next up is another RWD version, but this time packing 214bhp and a bigger 73kWh battery - helping to reduce the sprint benchmark time to 7.4 seconds.

With 301bhp and 605Nm of torque, the fastest 5 uses a dual-motor set-up providing four-wheel-drive and a 0-62mph time of 5.2 seconds - outpacing the Volkswagen ID.4 GTX model and keeping up with the more expensive 346bhp Ford Mustang Mach-E. All Ioniq 5 versions have a top speed of 115mph.

Have you considered?

Volkswagen ID.4 review
Volkswagen ID.4 - front
Volkswagen ID.4

Volkswagen ID.4 review

The Volkswagen ID.4 will appeal to EV buyers with a focus on family practicality and a decent range
28 Jul 2021
MG5 EV review
MG 5 EV
MG MG5

MG5 EV review

With its 250-mile range, practical estate body and keen pricing, the MG5 could be the smart all-electric choice
21 Jul 2021

Most Popular

New 2021 Volkswagen Taigo coupe-SUV breaks cover
Volkswagen Taigo R-Line - front
Volkswagen Taigo

New 2021 Volkswagen Taigo coupe-SUV breaks cover

The new VW Taigo is a sportier, more aggressive looking version of the brand’s T-Cross and is aimed at lifestyle buyers
29 Jul 2021
New Bowler Defender Challenge review
Bowler Defender Challenge - front
Land Rover Defender

New Bowler Defender Challenge review

The new Defender Challenge is the first Bowler under JLR ownership, and it’s a cracker
28 Jul 2021
New 2021 Kia EV6 boasts up to 328 miles of range
Kia EV6 - front
Kia EV6

New 2021 Kia EV6 boasts up to 328 miles of range

Kia reveals more specs for its bespoke electric car, with the EV6 offering long range and an 18-minute 80 per cent rapid recharge time
21 Jul 2021