In-depth reviews

Vauxhall Crossland X review - Interior, design and technology

The Crossland X is loaded with kit, but certain parts of the cabin feel built down to a cost

The Crossland X slots into the Vauxhall range as an all-new model, despite the fact it indirectly replaces the now discontinued Meriva MPV. Vauxhall is keen to place an SUV slant on its new car, hence the Mokka X inspired face, chunky, cladded wheel arches and raised ride height. LED daytime running lights are standard, as are alloy wheels. This new car gets PSA Group underpinnings too, using a modified Peugeot 2008 platform.

Some MPV influences are still evident, though, particularly at the rear. That’s because the Crossland X is positioned as a more versatile and practical proposition than other B-segment crossovers, and as such, the exterior shape is dictated by space requirements in the cabin. 

With the wheels pushed right out to the corners, plus that tall, boxy roofline and a steeply raked windscreen stretching far out in front of the dashboard, the Crossland X feels very spacious and airy inside. Headroom is excellent, while legroom in the back is also very good for this segment. 

Overall though, the Crossland X’s cabin prioritises function over form. It’s been cleverly designed and packaged to maximise space, and comes well equipped, too. But there’s little in the way of flair and some of the plastics are hard and scratchy to touch. As a bonus, you do get a leather steering wheel as standard, and things are livened up on Business Edition and Elite cars with ambient lighting throughout the cabin.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment 

In the cabin, the big tech news is the inclusion of a colour touchscreen infotainment system, which features as standard on all cars. The Griffin and Elite levels include a slightly smaller 7-inch screen, while the rest of the range adds an upgraded 8-inch version.

Entry-level versions don't include sat-nav, but the IntelliLink system is bundled with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, plus Bluetooth, a DAB radio and a USB connector at no extra cost. It sits angled towards the driver and is fairly slick and easy to use, with decent response to touches and a row of chunky physical buttons to help navigate the sub-menus.

A six-speaker audio setup with steering-wheel mounted controls comes as standard, although there is the option to upgrade at extra cost.

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.2 [83] Sport 5dr [Start Stop]
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £17,530

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.2 [83] Sport 5dr [Start Stop]
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £17,530

Fastest

  • Name
    1.2 [83] Sport 5dr [Start Stop]
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £17,530

Most Popular

Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home
Electric cars

Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home

New powers being sought to allow energy providers to turn off high-drain devices to manage electricity network
18 Sep 2020
Audi A3 vs Mercedes A-Class
Car group tests

Audi A3 vs Mercedes A-Class

The Audi A3 and Mercedes A-Class are strong competitors in the premium hatchback market - we find out which is best
19 Sep 2020
New Rolls-Royce Ghost 2020 review
Rolls-Royce Ghost

New Rolls-Royce Ghost 2020 review

The all-new luxury Rolls-Royce Ghost saloon brings new levels of refinement
18 Sep 2020