Infiniti G Convertible review

Our Rating: 
2
2.0/5.0
By Auto Express Test TeamComments

The Infiniti G Convertible is an alternative offering in a market dominated by German rivals

For: 
Originality, high specification, good safety features
Against: 
Very expensive, poor ride, small resale market

Infiniti, the luxury division of Japanese manufacturer Nissan’s empire, is gradually making headway on the British car market. The G Convertible is the brand’s first convertible, and it definitely will turn some heads, based purely on the car’s novelty factor. This aside, the Convertible catches the eye with its rather striking, simple lines and neatly detailed lights. The Infiniti delivers plenty of power too. Its V6 engine delivers suitably pacey acceleration and speed, although poor fuel economy and clumsy handling is disappointing.

Our choice: G37 Convertible GT Premium

Styling

3.7

With its bold looks and crafted curves, the Infiniti G Convertible certainly stands out. The bulging bonnet and high wing-mounted bi-zenon headlights set the cabriolet apart from its competitors, and its standard 19-inch ten-spoke alloys scream aggression. Sadly, Infiniti only offer the Convertible in a rather conservative range of colours, which more than underlines the age group it is aiming for when it comes to sales. The leather-clad interior is very luxurious and offset by quality dark plastics and brushed aluminium trimming.

Driving

3.4

There’s no two ways about it: the Infiniti G Convertible has a very hard ride and is unforgiveable on bumpy roads. Despite heavy reinforcement to the chassis, which adds a considerable amount of weight to the vehicle (182kg to be exact), the Infiniti also gives an unfortunate amount of body twist. However, its steering is pleasingly direct, so it's not completely devoid of driving pleasure. The V6 3.7-litre engine sounds decent too and can sprint from 0-62 in 6.4 seconds, although it must be worked hard to get the best out of its 316bhp.

Reliability

3.5

The Infiniti G Convertible hasn't gone through a Euro NCAP crash test yet, but it comes with six airbags as standard. Other systems such as the head restraints moving forward in an accident in a bid to minimise whiplash injuries and a pop-up system that cushions pedestrians in the case of an accident, add to the technology making the car safer. Infiniti was awarded the Euro NCAP Advanced Award for road safety innovation for the Japanese manufacturer’s Lane Departure Prevention (LDP) system and its potentially life-saving benefits. Although the convertible doesn’t feature this technology, it does come with a host of electronic stability and traction controls as standard.

Practicality

3.1

Compared to many of the other four-seater convertibles in this category, the Infiniti does well and offers rear passengers a decent amount of legroom. Taller people may also have to bend their necks when the roof is up, but it can be described as relatively confortable. Sadly this gain of space means the boot is very small and when the roof is down, luggage carrying potential evaporates. The hardtop makes the cabriolet an every-day and all-weather solution, as it keeps out more road noise than a traditional fabric roof and also insulates the car better from extreme temperatiures.

Running Costs

2

The Infiniti G Convertible is by far the most expensive car in its range and compared to rivals such as the BMW 3 Series Convertible and the Audi A5 Convertible, it struggles to justify the extra price. It does at least come full of equipment and standard 19-inch wheels. Sadly efficiency also lets down the Infiniti, as it struggles to better fuel efficiency levels of 20mpg. CO2 emissions coming from the V6 are equally poor and that means tax is also much higher than the efficient engine options on rival cars, especially the Audi.

Last updated: 19 Jun, 2012
Auto Express 1,342
For more breaking car news and reviews, subscribe to Auto Express - available as a weekly magazine and on your iPad. We'll give you 6 issues for £1 and a free gift!

Sponsored Links