Long-term test review: SEAT Leon SC FR

2 Jul, 2014 2:30pm Mat Watson

Our three-door SEAT Leon SC FR meets up with original Leon

Verdict

4

Mileage: 8,125 miles Real world fuel economy: 41.4mpg

A lot has happened in the past 12 years. Facebook was invented, the world went into economic meltdown, then bounced back, and the MkIII SEAT Leon won Auto Express Car of the Year.

I was a fan of the original Leon way back in 2002, and that’s why I recommended my mother buy one – and that’s the black car you see here. “It’s basically a VW Golf underneath, but looks better and is cheaper,” I told her, so she bought one nearly new for £12,000.

The Golf comparison still applies today, but by lining up old and new back-to-back, you can feel how much the Leon has improved in the past 12 years. The differences, quite frankly, are huge.

For starters, you can now get a three-door-only version of the Leon, like our white SC, while the car’s body panels are far more sculpted. Metal pressing has definitely come a long way since the early noughties. So, too, has headlight tech. The simple rectangular items on the MkI are bland compared to the LED-bejeweled units of the modern car.

SEAT Leon SC FR long-termer: old Leon driving

Inside, the improvements are even more obvious. With a similar dash to the Audi A3, the MkI Leon never felt shabby. But material quality has made a huge leap forward. So have seat comfort and in-car gadgets: the MkI’s cassette player is rather antiquated next to the MkIII’s touchscreen with iPod connectivity, DAB radio and satellite navigation.

Yet it’s how the two cars drive which is the biggest difference. At tickover, the old 1.9-litre diesel in my mother’s car is so gruff it sounds like it’s running on gravel, whereas the 1.4-litre TSI in our SC is barely audible. And despite being a whole lot faster, the claimed economy of 54.3mpg betters the 50mpg my mother gets from her Leon (although in my hands the SC is only doing around 35mpg).

SEAT Leon SC FR long-termer: Mat driving

Still, it’s a lot more comfortable. Our SC is in FR trim, so has slightly firmer suspension, but the way it rides is light years rather than just 12 years ahead of the old car. Still, my mother says her MkI has been pleasant to own and generally reliable, although a few years ago it needed new carpets and door seals due to leaks, while just recently both the front driver’s side electric window and air-con have packed up.

Would she buy another Leon? Well, she likes the new car, but now wants something with a higher driving position, so has a Nissan Qashqai in her sights – a model that didn’t even exist 12 years ago. I’ll be sticking with our SEAT, though.

SEAT Leon SC FR: report 1

The wheels are small, but our man loves three-door hot hatch

Mileage: 6,266 miles Real world fuel economy: 35.1mpg

SEAT Leon SC FR long-termer: wheels header

I need two extra inches. Or maybe even just one. That’s what I thought when we parked our recently arrived SEAT Leon SC 1.4 TSI next to the new Cupra. I am, of course, talking about alloy wheels. If I hadn’t seen the Cupra’s 19-inch rims, then I’d have been happy with the FR’s 17-inchers. But now I’ve clocked them, I feel a bit under-endowed.

However, apart from the smallish wheels, the rest of the design is rather pleasing. I especially like the headlamps. Audi may have LED (geddit?) the way with daytime running lights, but in the case of the new Leon, I think SEAT has outdone it. The thing is, though, I don’t think the Leon SC is sufficiently better looking than the five-door to warrant the loss in practicality.

I’m currently renovating my flat and not having a car with rear doors has made loading items a pain. I’d pay the extra £300 for the five-door – especially as if you want a stylish coupe, I think a Vauxhall Astra GTC is sexier than the Leon SC, particularly from the side and back.

SEAT Leon SC FR long-termer: interior

I’d still rather have the SEAT, though, as its talents run much deeper than the Vauxhall’s. It’s comfortable to travel in thanks to well judged sports suspension, which is firm but fair, a quiet cabin and an ideal driving position. And FR trim means I’ve got plenty of kit to enjoy, including sports seats, a leather multifunction steering wheel, a colour touchscreen, dual zone climate control and parking sensors.

You also get Bluetooth, which I have to admit I have never used – an iPhone with headphones is far better for calls when driving in my opinion, as no car manufacturer has mastered voice commands as well as Apple.

The FR also gets SEAT Drive Profile, which lets you alter the throttle response and steering weight. So I go for the former in sport mode, and the latter in comfort. Our car also has the sat-nav upgrade, but I’ve found it to be nowhere near as good as the system in the BMW 3 Series GT, which I was running previously. Granted, at £745 it costs less than half the price of BMW’s Professional system, but it lacks the latter’s useful traffic updates.

SEAT Leon SC FR long-termer: dials

On the move, our Leon SC reminds me of an old-school hot hatch in the way that you can really wring its neck and have some fun, without suddenly finding yourself doing silly speeds.

In fact, the performance delivered by our car’s 138bhp 1.4-litre turbo petrol engine is similar to that of an eighties Ford Escort RS Turbo, as they both claim 8.2 seconds to get from 0-62mph.

Of course, the new Leon handles loads better than an old Escort, but it does have some of the boy racer additions like side skirts and a roof spoiler. And I guess back in the day of the RS Turbo, 17-inch alloys were considered quite large.

Insurance quote (below) provided by AA (0800 107 0680) for a 42-year-old living in Banbury, Oxon, with three points.

Disqus - noscript

Not sure how you can say that the iPhone is better than the built in Bluetooth if you've never used it! Looks like the same steering wheel controls and in-dash display as my Alhambra which IMHO works a treat: no need to even find your phone let alone put on headphones. But to be fair I haven't used the iPhone, maybe it's magic...

I was wanting the 1.4tsi as my next car but the 35mpg scares me off. Looks like the 2.0TDCI is the one i'l be going for which is a shame as i wanted to ditch diesel and go back to petrol.

Do you really want bigger wheels? Sure they look good but they make the car ride more firmly, are more likely to tramline, more likely to have a puncture (and more likely to damage the wheel in the process) and new tyres cost a fortune. All that just to look better...no thanks.

Key specs

  • On fleet since: January 2014
  • Price new: £19,265
  • Engine: 1.4-litre 4cyl, 138bhp
  • CO2/tax: 119g/km/£30
  • Options: Convenience Pack (£150), Driver Assist Pack (£295), LED illumination pack (£60), Technology Pack (£1,075)
  • Insurance group/quote: Group: 20 Quote: £278
  • Mileage/economy: 8,125/41.4mpg
  • Any problems?: None so far
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