Skoda Yeti GreenLine 2014 review

24 Jan, 2014 10:00am Jimi Beckwith

We find out if the numbers add up for the Skoda Yeti GreenLine, the eco version of facelifted SUV

Verdict

3
The new look of the Skoda Yeti GreenLine is smarter and the interior is a little more luxurious, but the running costs and driving experience are barely changed. While it’s still comfortable and fun, the economy and emissions are starting to lag behind newer rivals like the Nissan Qashqai. If you’re after the most efficient small SUV around, there are better options.

We've always liked the Skoda Yeti, but so far it’s struggled to compete with rivals for economy and emissions. The GreenLine is the cleanest, most efficient model in the line-up, though, and we’ve tried the newly facelifted car on UK roads.

Skoda Yeti review

Powered by the same 104bhp 1.6 TDI as the pre-facelift car, this latest Yeti still promises 61.4mpg and 119g/km of CO2. That’s not bad, but it’s nowhere near the 74.3mpg and 98g/km Nissan claims for the Qashqai 1.5 dCi.

Still, this diesel engine is impressively punchy when it needs to be, even if it sounds pretty rough under acceleration. When on a calm cruise, however, the rattly soundtrack quickly fades into the background. You’ll find there’s enough torque to overtake slower cars relatively easily, too.

The facelift brings more grown-up styling, but the Yeti’s convincing driving dynamics and practicality remain more or less untouched. The steering is light yet responsive, and coupled with the typically settled ride, it makes the car not only relaxing, but also quite fun to drive. This is a pleasant surprise, as the GreenLine badge on the gearlever suggests the focus is more on low bills than driving thrills.

The Yeti remains solidly built and clearly laid out, with just a smattering of buttons on the wheel and across the dash. It’s not particularly plush or glamorous – despite a new soft leather steering wheel – but it feels up to the challenge of a tough life.

Skoda Yeti 2014 price revealed

The only real letdown is the touchscreen infotainment system and sat-nav, which is now a generation behind the latest VW Group offerings, and feels a bit slow.

When it was introduced, the Yeti was such good value and so capable that it was easy to recommend above its rivals. Four years later, models like the Nissan Qashqai and Mazda CX-5 have overtaken it, and this facelift isn’t enough to keep it in contention.

Yes, it’s well equipped and it costs £1,000 less than a Qashqai 1.5 dCi Acenta. But the Skoda isn’t the obvious choice it once was.

Disqus - noscript

This article is captioned Skoda Yeti 4x4, but as far as I can make out the Greenline is 2wd only. It adds to a growing impression that AE reviews are not infequently inexpert and superficial

I think that is not a growing impression, you can assume that has been a case for a while. Most articles seem to be thrown together in a hurry to fill space. AE is a light entertainment website, not factual or documentary. If you want a proper objective assessment of a car then you need to go elsewhere. Or best of all, try one out for yourself.

The 4x4 badging at the top is a quirk of our website structure - the car gets categorised as being in the '4x4' class, so all variants end up there.

If you would like to speak to one of our road testers about their knowledge of the car industry then I'm happy to pass on a phone number.

Key specs

  • Price: £19,605
  • Engine: 1.6-litre 4cyl turbodiesel
  • Power: 104bhp
  • Transmission: Five-speed manual, front-wheel drive
  • 0-62mph/top speed: 12.1 secs/109mph
  • Economy/CO2: 61.4mpg/119g/km
  • Equipment: 16-inch alloys, cruise control, rear parking sensors
  • On sale: Now
AEX 1337
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