Nissan Note review

Our Rating: 
4
4.0/5.0
By Auto Express Test TeamComments

The latest Nissan Note is just as practical as ever, but it's now more stylish and better to drive, too

For: 
Massive boot, spacious rear seats, range of efficient engines
Against: 
Noisy diesel, not as fun as the Fiesta, nor as luxurious as a Polo

Sponsored Links

The Nissan Note is a car for those who know what they want: practicality. The Note isn't hugely stylish or brilliant fun to drive but it has a range of economical engines, a huge amount of space inside and plenty of room in the back seats.

The new model isn't the last word in urban cool but it's got a certain charm to it compared to the previous model which had more pronounced MPV overtones. There are engine changes in the latest car as well, with two new 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engines taking their spot in the line-up.

The chassis has been tweaked for European roads so it's better to drive as well. There's lots of new safety equipment, including a surround view camera system, lane departure warning and blind spot monitoring.

There are four good-value trim levels to choose from: Visia, Acenta, Acenta Premium and Tekna. We'd go for the diesel version as it gets great economy and is punchy on the road, but go for the petrol 1.2 if you are planning to make shorter journeys.

Our choice: Note 1.5 dCi Acenta Premium

Styling

3.8

The new Nissan Note is more stylish than before, with bold headlamps and characterful lines cut into the sides of the bodywork - it's much better looking than the old MPV-style Note. It can't match superminis like the MINI or Ford Fiesta for style, though. Think of it as a sensible, practical kind of supermini along the lines of the Honda Jazz.

The Nissan Note interior is upmarket and looks great, with a curved dashboard and classy backlit dials, plus a gloss black centre console. There's loads of equipment as standard as well: All cars are fitted with Bluetooth and cruise control, while our Acenta Premium had sat-nav, climate control, steering wheel- mounted audio controls and rear privacy glass.

There are a few hard and scratchy plastics, however, which undermine the classier looks somewhat. Many will easily look past that, but for some it won't match the Volkswagen Polo for quality.

Driving

3.4

The Nissan Note is easy to drive around town, thanks to its compact size and light controls, while the £400 Safety Shield option includes a surround view camera system that helps get the car into the tightest spaces.

Nissan’s also fine-tuned the Note on European roads, so it's much better to drive here than it was before - but it still can't match cars like the Ford Fiesta for driver engagement. However the steering is well weighted body control is good too - it's better than a Honda Jazz, for example - but the ride is a little firm over less than pristine surfaces.

A characterful three-cylinder engine is available in the Note, which is strong enough despite the 1.2-litre capacity and 79bhp output. Buyers wanting more performance can pay £1,000 extra for the supercharged DIG-S, which delivers 98bhp and 147Nm of torque.

The Note does get a bit unsettled no the motorway, however. There’s some wind noise around the door mirrors and the engine labours on steep inclines. The brakes aren't up there with the best, either, as there's a spongy feel when you apply the pedal.

Reliability

4.1

The proven running gear underneath the new-look Note means it's sure to be a dependable supermini: the Micra, which shares parts with the Note, finished in a respectable 26th place in our Driver Power 2013 satisfaction survey.

A three-year/60,000-mile warranty gives good peace of mind and a breakdown recovery package is included for the same period - so you won't get stuck at the roadside.

As for safety, all models get six airbags, stability control and tyre pressure monitoring. The £400 Safety Shield pack adds blind spot monitoring, lane departure warning, surround view cameras and moving object detection. The latter sounds a warning if it detects movement behind the car, such as a pedestrian, when you’re reversing. All of this means the Note is almost certain to get a five-star rating from Euro NCAP when it's tested.

Practicality

4.5
Ford Fiesta, Nissan Note, Honda Jazz hatchback 2013 seats

The Nissan Note is one of the most practical cars in its class, in part thanks to some clever packaging. The wide-opening doors mean it's easy to climb inside, and the big windows make the cabin feel airy and spacious.

A sliding rear bench lets you choose between loads of rear legroom or a massive 411-litre boot. Even in its smallest configuration, the Note offers 325 litres of luggage space, which is 35 litres more than in a Ford Fiesta.

There's some shopping bag hooks plus a 12V power supply in the boot, and Nissan’s Flexiboard system can be used to divide the load area to stop shopping rolling around. Need more space? There’s a deep cubby beneath the boot floor.

There are plenty of storage spaces around the cabin and a huge glovebox too. In fact, the only blots on the Note’s copybook are its small door pockets.

The steering wheel isn't height-adjustable but its high-set driving position is comfortable enough.

Running Costs

4.2

The new Nissan Note is very economical, with all engines equipped with stop-start technology. The 1.2-litre DIG-S petrol and 1.5-litre dCi diesel models emit less than 100g/km of CO2, which means road tax is free. Go for the standard 1.2 and it'll only cost £20 a year, though.

The 1.5-litre diesel engine returns 78.5mpg, the 1.2-litre DIG-S petrol returns 65.7mpg and the smallest 1.2-litre petrol returns 60.1mpg. There's even an eco mode that encourages you to drive smoothly to improve your economy figures.

Nissan also offers a £199 pre-paid servicing pack, giving three years/36,000 miles of routine maintenance. It’s not all good news, though, because our experts predict the new car will hold on to only 39.8 per cent of its value over three years.

Disqus - noscript

No offence, but I didn't like the looks of the old car. The new looks pretty good in the way of a Kia Venga Hyundai IX-35 or Honda Jazz. The engine line-up looks fine too - all falling in low or zero VED band. Not bad for a mini-MPV.

I assume the auto has a CVT gearbox, so that takes it off my shortlist!
I have driven a couple of different cars with CVT and it's horrible!

I really like this, especially the one with the sports appearance pack. Will take a closer look when it comes out.

Notice that AE kept away from mentioning the Honda Jazz but copying is the sincerest form of flattery.

Style? Who is kidding who? It's not that much better than the old car which was awful. It seams that Renault have cascaded the most useless of their styists into Nissan - hence the "Joke" and a few others. Nissan deserves much better than this.

Personally, I preferred the look of the old one! Nissan is intent on ruining its range for some reason. After the horrendous new Micra after two series of really neat designs, and then the Hideous Juke, and now a more boring Note. I can't wait to see how they muck up the Qashqai!

'It's not that much better than the old car which was awful'
The old car was hardly 'awful'. It was quite smart looking and this new model improves on that further. You could call a mid 90's Ford Scorpio or a Ssangyong Rodius awful.
What do you drive thats so beautiful? An E-type Jag.......LOL!

I didn't find the old car awful and if it hadn't been for the Honda Jazz I may have bought one.

I prefer the looks of the new Note; I found the old one too tall and boxy. This one seems well-equipped and the DIG-S engine appears impressive.

As far as I'm aware the new Note has the same automatic gearbox as it's predecessor; only this time it's only available with the DIG-S engine.

Last updated: 13 Feb, 2014
AEX 1337
For more breaking car news and reviews, subscribe to Auto Express - available as a weekly magazine and on your iPad. We'll give you 6 issues for £1 and a free gift!

Sponsored Links