Hyundai i20 review

Our Rating: 
3
3.0/5.0
2014 model
By Auto Express Test TeamComments

The Hyundai i20 is a spacious supermini that takes on the Ford Fiesta and VW Polo

For: 
Sharp styling, spacious interior
Against: 
Engines feel dated, poor performance

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The Hyundai i20 is the latest arrival in the competitive supermini sector. A rival for the likes of the Ford Fiesta, VW Polo and Vauxhall Corsa, the all-new model has its work cut out if it is to succeed - but the i20 gets off to a good start with a sharp new exterior look and a spacious interior.

The growth spurt is down to the all-new platform the i20 has adopted. It’s longer, lower and wider than before, with a wheelbase that has increased by 45mm - meaning there’s more space inside for passengers.

The new model's sharp lines, floating C-pillar, and swooping bonnet give a more sophisticated look than before. A wide grille, LED daytime running lights and a full-length panoramic roof have also been fitted.

From launch there will be five engines available, three petrol and two diesel variants. All of the engines have been carried over from the outgoing model with minor efficiency tweaks to ensure EU6 emissions regulations have been met. The i20 is not yet available with a three-cylinder turbocharged engine – unlike rivals – but in 2015 Hyundai will introduce its own.

For a supermini the i20 is also extremely practical. The 326-litre boot is larger than that on a Ford Focus and there’s enough space in the rear for three adult passengers to sit comfortably.

Five trim levels - S, S Blue, SE, Premium and Premium SE - are available, and standard kit across the range includes front-electric windows, privacy glass and USB connectivity. SE models are expected to make up the bulk of orders and add 16-inch alloys, Bluetooth, cruise control, reversing sensors and front fog lights.

Styling

4

The i20 has one of the more intricate designs in the supermini sector, so for style-conscious buyers it gets off to a good start.

A long, swooping bonnet flanked by narrow LED headlamps gives a more premium look, while the wide-mouth grille gives a broader stance. Proportionally, the i20 is 40mm longer, 24mm wider and 16mm lower than the previous model, and the wheelbase has been stretched by 45mm as well. 

It’s one of the largest superminis in its class and significantly larger than the already spacious VW Polo. The neat floating C-pillars at the rear not only help to mask the i20’s inflated proportions but also give a more coupe-like profile. 

The cabin design is neat and tidy, if lacking a little bit of flair. Buyers in this class have become accustomed to touchscreen infotainment system giving access to most of the car’s controls, but even in top spec models, the i20 isn’t available with such a feature. This can makes the cabin look a little dated when compared with rivals, but a dealer-fit option is available from SE spec upwards.

Driving

2.5

Until the 1.0-litre three-cylinder turbocharged engine arrives next year, buyers have five powertrains to choose from. Options include a 74bhp as well as an 84bhp version of the 1.2-litre petrol and a more powerful 99bhp 1.4-litre petrol engine. The more frugal diesel options are made up of a 74bhp 1.1-litre three cylinder and 89bhp 1.4-litre four-cylinder. 

At slower speeds it deals with speed bumps and potholes well enough but load the car up with passengers or luggage and it reveals suspension that doesn’t appear to have enough travel. It thuds into larger imperfections, where rivals such as the Polo deal with those situations a lot better.

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The i20's 84bhp 1.2 isn’t turbocharged so feels lethargic and short on power. A 0-62mph time of 13.1 seconds highlights its power deficiency: a 1.2-litre Polo, for example, will do the same sprint in 10.8 seconds. 

If you need a little more grunt the 1.4-litre diesel has far more urgency about it. It’s a little loud at idle but on the move power delivery is smoother and the car is quicker. Both models do handle well, however. The steering is light but precise, with minimal body roll and the manual gearbox – five-speed in the petrol and six-speed in the diesel – has a short and well-weighted throw.

Reliability

3

Although yet to be tested, the outgoing i20 scored a maximum five stars in the Euro NCAP crash rating when it was tested back in 2009. With a raft of new tech, safety aids along with a high-strength steel construction, the new model looks set to maintain that five-star record. 

As standard, every i20 comes fitted with six airbags, stability control and emergency stop signal. Lane departure warning is also offered to buyers, while the headlamps also illuminate the direction the driver turns to aid visibility. 

The i20 didn’t feature in our 2014 Driver Power satisfaction survey, but Hyundai finished a disappointing 18th overall in the manufacturers ranking. Still, the manufacturer finished just outside of the top 10 for reliability so buyers shouldn’t expect too many issues. As ever, the i20 comes with Hyundai’s five-year unlimited mileage warranty and breakdown cover.

Practicality

4.8

As the i20 has significantly grown in size over the outgoing model, it’s no surprise the second-generation supermini is one of the most practical and spacious in its class. 

It’s longer, lower and wider than before, with 45mm added to the wheelbase. There’s ample room in the rear and the floor is only slightly elevated so you can easily sit three adults on the rear bench comfortably. As a sector first a full-length panoramic roof is available. It's standard on top spec Premium SE models, and while it does slightly encroach on headroom, this model still rivals the Ford Fiesta for head space. 

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The 326-litre boot is huge and one of the the biggest in the class. It’s even larger than some models from the class above – the Ford Focus only offers 316 litres of space. A false floor can be removed and stowed away to further increase space and the standard 60:40 split rear bench folds flat, freeing up 1,042 litres of space. 

Running Costs

3

As all of the engines have been carried over from the outgoing i20, the new model isn’t as cheap to run as a VW Polo. The 74bhp 1.2-litre petrol returns 58.9mpg and emits 112g/km of CO2, with the more powerful 84bhp version returning 55.4mph and 119g/km. Despite the power difference, both models sit in the same tax band. 

The range-topping 99bhp 1.4-litre petrol jumps a tax band with CO2 emissions at 127g/km but 51.4mpg isn’t much to sacrifice considering how much more performance you get. 

If you plan on doing longer journeys, the diesel models will be more suitable. The 1.1-litre three-cylinder in S Blue trim is able to return over 88mpg with tax-free emissions of 84g/km. The more powerful 89bhp diesel, however, will still return an impressive 68.9mpg - but falls just short of tax-free motoring with emissions of 106g/km. 

Last updated: 18 Nov, 2014
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