Peugeot 1007

Peculiar doors and challenging styling mean there is lots that's new about Peugeot's 1007 - not least the name. This is the 'one thousand and seven', not the 'one double O seven' - and according to Peugeot, it is out to change the way we think about mini-MPVs.

In its sliding doors the 1007 has a unique selling point. But how many buyers will be willing to pay the premium over a conventional hatchback to enjoy them remains to be seen. Peugeot de-serves credit for being bold enough to put a car such as the 1007 into production, but it has limited appeal in such a competitive sector.

Peculiar doors and challenging styling mean there is lots that's new about Peugeot's 1007 - not least the name. This is the 'one thousand and seven', not the 'one double O seven' - and according to Peugeot, it is out to change the way we think about mini-MPVs.

It is certainly off to a good start. On UK roads, it looks unique - even though it wears the firm's now familiar gaping grille with pride. The sharply styled rear is probably the prettiest view; in profile the metal runners for the sliding doors, small wheels and bulky door handles are less appealing.

At 3.73m long, the 1007 is 10cm shorter than a 206, but there is lots of space inside thanks to its height. There is a host of cubbies, but it is disappointing that the 1007 is strictly a four-seater with a pair of removable MPV-style folding chairs in the back.

Up front, the changeable Cam�l�o trim cannot disguise the cheap plastics. The view ahead is excellent, but those big doors mean it is a long reach back to grab the seatbelt and over-the-shoulder visibility is compromised.

We drove the entry-level 1.4-litre, fitted with a five-speed manual gearbox. This is expected to be the biggest selling model. There is also a 2-Tronic version - essentially an automated manual with shift paddles. It is optional on the 1.4 and is the sole choice on the larger 1.6-litre petrol. The 1.4 HDi gets only the conventional manual. From behind the wheel, the tall-riding 1007 drives as you would expect. The 1.4-litre model is slow, while enthusiastic cornering results in excessive body roll. Motorway speeds see the engine struggle to overcome the bluff aerodynamics.

Equipment wise, air-con, six airbags and ESP are all standard, but metallic paint and alloys cost £325 and £400 respectively. There is also a five-star Euro NCAP crash test rating to consider.

In terms of value, you can buy Fiat's Idea mini-MPV from only £9,995 and for the £12,600 price of a 1007 Sport, you could opt for a much more practical 206 SW. While the clever doors improve access, we have major doubts about the limited number of seats, high list price and unusual styling.

Most Popular

New 2022 MG7 could be a cut-price Audi A5
MG 7 - side
News

New 2022 MG7 could be a cut-price Audi A5

The new MG7 saloon has been teased ahead of its August reveal
8 Aug 2022
UK petrol and diesel prices: unleaded to fall below 175p
High fuel prices. £2 per litre
News

UK petrol and diesel prices: unleaded to fall below 175p

Average price of petrol expected to fall below 175p per litre for the first time since early June
12 Aug 2022
New Kia XCeed facelift gets £22,995 price tag
Kia XCeed - front
News

New Kia XCeed facelift gets £22,995 price tag

Tech, design and interior updates make up a series of subtle but important enhancements for Kia’s big-selling family crossover
11 Aug 2022