Skoda Octavia (2013 - 2020) review - MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

Impressive economy is one of the Octavia diesel's strengths

None of the engines in the Skoda Octavia range are particularly thirsty, although the 1.6 TDI diesel is the most efficient, and the Octavia's 2.0 TDI diesel also returns good economy figures. They're not quite as good as they once were under the latest WLTP test procedure, but that won't have any negative effect on everyday fuel economy, it just means you're more likely to achieve the claimed MPG figure in everyday driving. 

New WLTP economy testing results for the 1.6 TDI come in at up to 57.7mpg and emissions of 128g/km. These figures deteriorate if you add the DSG gearbox or move up a trim level, with the extra weight and larger wheel combinations having a negative impact on fuel economy.

The sporty Skoda Octavia vRS is also available with a diesel engine, which is far from a gas-guzzler, and like the rest of the 2.0 TDI diesels, only comes with a DSG auto gearbox. With standard four-wheel-drive, it manages 47.9mpg and emits 156g/km of CO2. Even the petrol version of the Skoda Octavia vRS is impressive with 37.7mpg and CO2 emissions of 169g/km (36.7mpg and 174g/km for the estate version).

The 2.0 TSI (190PS) engine is only offered as an estate, in combination with DSG auto transmission and SE L trim, returning 35.8mpg and 178g/km emissions, while the 148bhp 1.5 TSI is still quite punchy and provides good numbers. With the DSG gearbox, it manages 46.3mpg, plus 137g/km of CO2. With the manual, 51.4mpg, and CO2 emissions of 124g/km.

The 1.0 TSI also makes for an efficient, tempting alternative to the diesels. It manages 52.3mpg with a manual box and emissions of 122g/km.

Overall, the Skoda Octavia is good value to buy thanks to a high level of standard equipment and low servicing costs - this means it's not an expensive car to keep on the road.

Insurance groups

Octavia vRS drivers pay a price for driving one of the fastest Skoda road cars ever built, and it comes in the shape of group 29 insurance. Still, that’s on a par with other similarly performing cars elsewhere in the VW group, while the vRS TDI is slightly lower in Group 24.

Other Octavias in the line-up are more affordable to cover. The 1.0-litre TSI is group 15, along with the 1.6 TDI, while the 1.5 TSI and 2.0 TDIs range from 18 to 21 depending on model spec.

Depreciation

If you’re buying an Octavia privately you will lose a significant amount in depreciation over three years of ownership, but at least you can be confident buyers of its rivals are faring a lot worse.

If used demand for the latest Octavias keeps pace with the last generation, you might expect to retain around 45 per cent of your car’s value. Typically TDIs have done a little better, as have mid-range trim levels, while estates tend to hold on to a bit more value than the hatchback.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.0 TSI SE 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £21,425

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.4 TSI iV SE Technology DSG 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £31,130

Fastest

  • Name
    2.0 TSI vRS 5dr DSG
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £32,725

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