Over 11,000 new drivers lost their licences in 2019

New figures show 11,125 drivers lost their licences in 2019, with insurance-related offences causing almost half of bans

£12 tool can hack your car

More than 11,000 newly qualified drivers lost their licences in 2019 under the New Drivers Act 1995, new data has revealed.

The New Drivers Act means any newly qualified driver is placed on a probationary period for the first two years of holding a full licence, during which they receive an automatic ban for accruing six or more penalty points. Both theory and practical tests must be retaken before being allowed back on the road.

Some 11,125 new drivers had their licences revoked under the act in 2019, according to DVSA (Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency) data obtained by AA Driving School via a Freedom of Information request.

Of these cases, 5,503 (49 per cent) were the result of insurance-related offences, with an average of 14 new drivers per day caught behind the wheel of a vehicle not covered by a valid insurance policy. Meanwhile, 2,871 (25 per cent) of the bans were for speeding offences.

In addition, there were 602 bans resulting from “distraction”, such as using a mobile phone behind the wheel, 115 cases of new drivers failing to stop after an accident, 96 bans for alcohol-related driving offences and 40 for drug offences.

Sarah Rees, managing director of AA Driving School, commented: “The amount of people who are caught without car insurance is staggering. It’s a legal requirement not only for new drivers, but drivers of all experiences.

“Statistics showing licence losses under the New Drivers Act are often used as a means to call for stringent graduated drivers licencing to be brought into the UK, but these figures show insurance is actually the single biggest barrier to new drivers staying legal and keeping hold of their licence.

“More must be done to educate people on the risks of driving when uninsured, as well as improve education around other risky driving behaviours, such as speeding and using handheld mobile phones.”

Do you think there should be harsher penalties for bad driving? Let us know in the comments below...

Recommended

Driving tests to resume in England this week
Driving test

Driving tests to resume in England this week

Driving tests will resume in England from 22 July, with learners urged to check with their instructors whether they're still ready to try and pass
20 Jul 2020
What is a clearway? Urban clearways, clearways and red routes explained
Tips & advice

What is a clearway? Urban clearways, clearways and red routes explained

If you’re unsure of the difference between a clearway, an urban clearway and a red route, you’ve come to the right place.
3 Jun 2020

Most Popular

New 2021 BMW M3 launched with huge grille and 503bhp
BMW 3 Series M3 Coupe

New 2021 BMW M3 launched with huge grille and 503bhp

The new sixth-generation BMW M3 Competition saloon gets a 503bhp straight-six engine and four-wheel-drive
22 Sep 2020
Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home
Electric cars

Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home

New powers being sought to allow energy providers to turn off high-drain devices to manage electricity network
18 Sep 2020
New Honda Civic Type R 2020 review
Honda Civic Type R

New Honda Civic Type R 2020 review

We find out if the revised Honda Civic Type R can stay at the top of the hot hatch class
22 Sep 2020