Skip advert
Advertisement
In-depth reviews

Kia Venga (2010-2019) review - Engines, performance and drive

Most at home in the city or relaxed cruising out of town, the Venga doesn’t respond well to pressing-on

Overall Auto Express Rating

3.0 out of 5

Engines, performance and drive Rating

3.2 out of 5

Find your Kia Venga
Offers from our trusted partners on this car and its predecessors...
Hassle-free way to a brand new car
Or are you looking to sell your car?
Customers got an average £1000 more vs part exchange quotes
Advertisement

With quick, if lifeless, steering and reasonable grip, the Venga is surprisingly agile on twisting back roads.

Longer-travel suspension means there’s a noticeable amount of body roll if you’re a little too energetic with your corner entry speed, and the squidgy steering doesn’t give much feedback.

The Venga is more about relaxed cruising in urban areas than blasting down a country road. Here it makes more sense, with a soft chassis set-up that soaks up cracked roads and rutted tarmac well.

Advertisement - Article continues below

On the motorway, the Venga is refined and offers smooth cruising ability, while even on B-roads it’s comfortable, floating nicely over bumps. It never feels engaging, though, and it’s a shame that the engine lacks any real shove, even if the light five-speed manual gearbox is pleasant to use.

Engines

There’s a wide choice of engines in the Kia Venga, although matters are complicated because different trim levels have different options. Entry-level 1 models come with 1.4-litre petrol or diesel engines, both with 89bhp and a manual gearbox only, while if you go for 2 spec, you also get the option of a 123bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine with an automatic box.

Ford B-MAX vs Kia Venga

Buyers choosing the top-spec Venga 3 and Venga 4 models can pick from the 123bhp 1.6-litre petrol engine with manual or automatic transmissions, or a 114bhp 1.6-litre CRDi diesel manual – and the latter is the cleanest and most economical model in the range.

In fact, diesel will be the best bet for most buyers, as the 1.4 and 1.6 CRDi engines combine stronger efficiency with decent mid-range performance, and their six-speed manual boxes serve up greater long distance refinement. Petrol 0-60mph times vary from 10.4 seconds (1.6 manual) to 12.4 seconds (1.4 manual), while the diesels do it in 11.0 seconds (1.6 manual) or 13.7 seconds (1.4 manual).

Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement

Most Popular

'The cure for slow electric car sales is simple - lower prices'
Mike Rutherford opinion - Skoda Enyaq tracking shot
Opinion

'The cure for slow electric car sales is simple - lower prices'

Mike Rutherford thinks the prices of electric cars is the number one thing deterring consumers from making the switch
14 Apr 2024
Toyota Yaris vs Renault Clio 2024 twin test: hybrid supermini battle
Toyota Yaris vs Renault Clio E-Tech - front tracking
Car group tests

Toyota Yaris vs Renault Clio 2024 twin test: hybrid supermini battle

With more and more electrified rivals arriving, Toyota has given its hybrid-only Yaris a facelift. We put it up against Renault’s class-leading Clio.
13 Apr 2024
‘Dacia Zen’ seven-year warranty brings added peace of mind
Dacia Duster - tailgate
News

‘Dacia Zen’ seven-year warranty brings added peace of mind

The value brand’s new warranty is also available on used cars, as well as for existing Dacia customers
16 Apr 2024