In-depth reviews

SEAT Ibiza review - Interior, design and technology

Sharp exterior lines carry over to the spacious interior, while the SEAT Ibiza features new on-board tech

Although the latest SEAT Ibiza is a fraction (2mm) shorter than the old model, the MQB A0 platform means the wheelbase has extended by 95mm, so there's much more space inside – SEAT says rear legroom is improved by 35mm, while the square-shaped boot is especially spacious at 355 litres.

More importantly the car has got much wider – by 85mm – and it sits ever-so-slightly lower, giving it a sportier look on the road. That’s accentuated by the sharp creases along the sides, the narrow front lights with LED daytime running lights and more creases running down the bonnet. This is a seriously good-looking supermini.

The good looks continue inside with more sharp lines around the dash and plenty of shoulder and headroom in the front and back. A six foot passenger can just about sit behind a six foot driver in reasonable comfort, but there’ll be plenty of room for three children across the back bench.

The facelifted Ibiza brings a revised interior and new levels of tech to help lift its appeal. Once sat in the driver's seat you'll notice new soft-touch materials across the dash and extra chrome trim, while the redesigned air vents add LED illumination on FR and XCELLENCE trims. A leather-trimmed steering wheel and a black headlining also feature on higher-spec cars. 

We found the multi-function steering wheel (controlling audio and cruise control) a little fiddly to use, but the Ibiza does keep physical dials for the air-con system, which are easier to operate on the move.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment 

The Ibiza SE include a 8.25-inch touchscreen, while all other trim levels come with a 9.2-inch version. All feature Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, with integrated sat-nav available on SE Technology variants and above. 

The system gets a couple of touch-sensitive shortcuts running down the left-hand side of the display. This includes the volume controls, but there is also a physical wheel on the steering wheel itself. Boot-up times are slow, but the system responds to commands quickly once it’s loaded. There are areas which don’t seem particularly logical, though.

The colour display is clear and sharp, with the screen itself now in a more useful position than before, sitting slightly ahead of the dash. If you're after digital instrumentation, you'll need to upgrade to either the FR Sport or XCELLENCE Lux trims which include the Digital Cockpit tech.

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