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In-depth reviews

Fiat Panda review - MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

No version of the Panda will cost much to run, even if you can't match the official fuel economy figures

The update to the range in 2019 dropped all engines bar the 1.2 petrol, which has a quoted fuel economy of 49.6mpg in Pop and Easy trim, while the Lounge cars quote 48.7mpg. The higher-riding City Cross has a claimed figure of 42.8mpg, while the 1.0-litre three-cylinder Mild Hybrid manages 49.6mpg

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The TwinAir petrol is stil available in the Panda 4x4, where quoted fuel economy is 37.7mpg, some way short of the claimed economy Fiat published under the old NEDC test (see below).

Looking at past engines, obviously the 1.3 MultiJet diesel is the top performer, claiming 72.4mpg on the older NEDC test. It also emits 104g/km of CO2, so cars registered before April 2017 cost £30 a year in road tax.

TwinAir petrol models registered before that date are exempt from road tax, thanks to emissions of 99g/km. It also claims respectable 67.3mpg fuel economy on the NEDC test cycle, although our tests have consistently indicated that you'll struggle to get anywhere near that in real-world driving. This needn’t be a major problem given the typically low mileages owners of cars like the Panda tend to cover, and some drivers will feel a small drop in efficiency is a reasonable price to pay for the TwinAir’s engaging nature.

All engines benefit from efficient, fuel-saving stop/start technology, which cuts the engine when idling, so no Panda is going to be a frequent visitor to the filling station pumps.

Insurance groups

Standard versions of the Fiat Panda have insurance group ratings of between 3 and 6, so buyers should have no trouble getting cover cheaply. Nevertheless, some rivals like the Skoda Citigo are available with group one insurance, which might be significant if you’re shopping for a first car. The 4x4 models are slightly higher, with the standard model in group 7 and the 4x4 Cross in a heady group 10.

Depreciation

As the city car sector has exploded with new contenders, their traditionally strong residuals have begun to weaken a little. Fiat has never been one of the strongest performers for used values, either. That said, considering the low initial purchase price, the depreciation isn’t too dreadful. Our experts predict the Fiat will retain 32-37 per cent of its new price after three years, with the chunky 4x4 models at the upper end of the range.

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