Advertisement
In-depth reviews

Lexus LC review - Interior, design and technology

Build quality is strong, but design is a mixed bag – from the minimalist door panels to the ergonomic mess that is the dashboard

There’s a throwback to the Lexus LFA supercar inside the LC. The large dial in the centre of the instrument binnacle will slide sideways to reveal another screen that controls some of the vehicle settings and provides more driving data. It’s a neat touch and a bit of showmanship, but sadly the rest of the interior is something of a mixed bag.

Advertisement - Article continues below

On the positive side, real craftsmanship is evident throughout the cabin, and nowhere more so than on the sweeping door panels, with what appears like a floating aluminium handle – a minimalist delight.

Sadly, though, the dash and steering wheel are an ergonomic mess, with buttons littered about like popcorn on a cinema floor. For example, you’ll either leave the lane departure warning on or, more likely, off – so why stick a button controlling it on the steering wheel?

And the horns sticking out of the instrument binnacle with controls for the driving modes on one side and the traction control on the other look like the designers forgot to include a few more buttons elsewhere. Lexus would do well to benchmark BMW’s iDrive system for vehicle and infotainment controls.

Advertisement
Advertisement - Article continues below

That said, the quality is exceptional, and the seats are really comfy, whether you go for luxury spec, with material that flows over the seat shoulders like Superman’s cape, or the grippier seats in Sport and Sport+ models.

Advertisement - Article continues below

And, whichever model you choose, there’ll be plenty of technology on board to make life easier and to pamper you – as you’d expect in a luxury GT.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

Audiophiles have long headed to Lexus for a great in-car experience, and the LC should be no different, with the 13-speaker system from high-end hi-fi specialists Mark Levinson. The system has been specially tuned for the LC and is the first to feature Clari-Fi – technology that boosts compressed audio files like those stored on smartphones almost back to their uncompressed state.

If you don’t opt for the Mark Levinson system (which is standard on the Limited Edition model, and optional on the rest of the range), there’s a bespoke Pioneer surround sound system for you to feast your ears on.

Although you don’t get Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, there’s still lots of functionality and a large 10.3-inch screen. But the Lexus’s infotainment is infuriating. The touchpad is one of the worst on the market; it’s borderline unusable on the move and has far too many steps for each action. Other systems, notably BMW’s iDrive, do it much better.

Advertisement

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    500 5.0 [464] 2dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £77,144

Most Economical

  • Name
    500h 3.5 2dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £78,459

Fastest

  • Name
    500 5.0 [464] 2dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £77,144
Advertisement

Most Popular

Best new car deals 2020
Best cars & vans

Best new car deals 2020

Secure your dream model from our list of the best new car deals on the market right now
6 Aug 2020
New 2022 Ineos Grenadier: prices, specs and launch date
Ineos Grenadier

New 2022 Ineos Grenadier: prices, specs and launch date

Ineos Automotive’s spiritual successor to the old Land Rover Defender will go on sale soon, with a starting price of around £50,000
6 Aug 2020
Over a quarter of drivers are late for their MoT
MOT testing station
Consumer news

Over a quarter of drivers are late for their MoT

Motorists who drive a car without a valid MoT certificate risk a fine of up to £1,000
7 Aug 2020