In-depth reviews

Nissan Leaf review - Reliability and safety

A five-star safety rating bodes well, as do the high levels of safety-related technology fitted to the car

This latest Leaf scored a full five stars out of five when tested by the experts at Euro NCAP in 2018, scoring 93% for adult safety and 86% for child occupant protection.

Similarly, we’re reassured by the large amount of safety-related tech that comes on the car. As well as the usual collection of airbags, ABS and ESP, every version also has Intelligent Emergency Braking (which will automatically apply the brakes if it senses a possible impact), Lane Departure Warning and Intelligent Lane Intervention, which will guide you back into lane, if you start to drift out of it. 

Also standard are Nissan’s Intelligent Trace Control and Intelligent Ride Control systems. The former will automatically apply the brakes to keep the car on its desired cornering line, while the latter uses a combination of the engine and brakes to prevent the car pitching up and down as it travels along a poorly surfaced road.

It takes advantage of the way that a car’s nose will rise slightly when the driver accelerates, and then fall again when the driver brakes or just lifts off the accelerator. So, by imperceptibly adjusting the brakes or accelerator, the system can make the car ride more smoothly.

Beyond that, the Pro Pilot system (an option on N-Connecta trim and standard on Tekna) not only adjusts your speed to keep you a set distance from the car in front – bringing the car to a complete halt, if necessary – it will also keep you centred in your lane.

The Leaf ranked 24th in the 2020 Driver Power ownership survey, which is a pretty good result. Nissan itself achieved 11th place out of 30 manufacturers, well ahead of rivals such as SEAT, Volkswagen and Ford.

Warranty

Like every Nissan car, the Leaf comes with a three-year/60,000-mile warranty. This is about average for this class, but it can be extended for an additional fee.

However, beyond that standard warranty, there is also some extra cover to recognise the fact that the Leaf is an electric car.

For a start, the car comes with a five-year/60,000-mile warranty on all the dedicated EV components; and, for eight years/100,000 miles, the battery warranty cover protects against capacity loss of more than nine of its 12 bars, as shown on the capacity gauge on the dashboard.

Servicing

Service intervals on the Leaf are every 18,000 miles – the same as on a diesel Qashqai, for example. 

Nissan also operates a system of fixed-price servicing options, starting at around £150 for a minor service on an electric car – which is cheaper than for a petrol or diesel model. 

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    110kW Acenta 40kWh 5dr Auto [6.6kw Charger]
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £29,790

Most Economical

  • Name
    160kW e+ Tekna 62kWh 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £39,340

Fastest

  • Name
    160kW e+ Tekna 62kWh 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £39,340

Most Popular

Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home
Electric cars

Energy firms want the right to switch off electric cars charging at home

New powers being sought to allow energy providers to turn off high-drain devices to manage electricity network
18 Sep 2020
Audi A3 vs Mercedes A-Class
Car group tests

Audi A3 vs Mercedes A-Class

The Audi A3 and Mercedes A-Class are strong competitors in the premium hatchback market - we find out which is best
19 Sep 2020
New Rolls-Royce Ghost 2020 review
Rolls-Royce Ghost

New Rolls-Royce Ghost 2020 review

The all-new luxury Rolls-Royce Ghost saloon brings new levels of refinement
18 Sep 2020