In-depth reviews

Nissan Leaf review - Range, charging and running costs

Running on electric power only and with zero tailpipe emissions, this is a very cheap car to own

One of the major attractions of any electric car is how little it can cost to run. Depending on how you drive and charge it, it can work out to be significantly cheaper than a conventional petrol or diesel car.

When you plug into one of the sockets under the flap in the nose to charge up, it’ll take 21 hours from empty to 100% off a household three-pin plug socket, 7.5 hours with a home 7kW charger or you can get an 80% charge in 40 minutes from a 50kW fast charger.

The Leaf e+ has longer charging times thanks to its bigger battery. From a plug socket, it's a huge 32 hours, while a wallbox takes 11 and a half hours, so if you're charging a flat battery overnight, you best get it plugged in as soon as possible to guarantee a full charge.

Perhaps the big question is: how far will it go? According to the new Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (designed to produce a more representative result than the previous test), the standard Leaf will travel as far as 168 miles; and, if our test drives of the car are anything to go by, around 150 miles should be achievable.

However, in common with any electric car, the range you actually achieve will also depend hugely on the way you drive, the time of year (cold weather has a negative impact on driving range) and how much you’re carrying. 

Again, the Leaf e+ has better figures than the standard car, with a WLTP combined range of 239 miles.

Regardless of how far you go, having zero tailpipe emissions also means that the car gives you access to further savings. For example, the car qualifies for the maximum government incentive for buyers of Ultra Low Emissions Vehicles (currently £2,500) and is exempt from the London Congestion Charge. 

Regular maintenance can also be cheaper on the Leaf than on a petrol or diesel car, because there are fewer moving parts, and you won’t have to pay for things like oil changes. In addition, using the e-Pedal system reduces brake wear, as it uses electrical resistance to slow the car instead of the discs and pads so you'll save on costs there, too.

You’ll also save on annual road tax rates. From the second year onwards, electric cars are exempt from Vehicle Excise Duty

Insurance groups 

The Leaf range starts from insurance group 21, but climbs to group 26, so higher-spec cars will incur more expensive premiums. However, in comparison, a Peugeot e-208 in GT trim sits in group 28 for insurance.

Depreciation

The Leaf holds onto around 50% of its value after three years and 36,000 miles, so as well as providing you with low running costs, the all-electric family hatch should provide you with a decent return come resale time.

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    110kW Acenta 40kWh 5dr Auto [6.6kw Charger]
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £28,440

Most Economical

  • Name
    160kW e+ N-Connecta 62kWh 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £32,890

Fastest

  • Name
    160kW e+ N-Connecta 62kWh 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £32,890

Most Popular

'The death of cheap cars will be a travesty for personal mobility'
Opinion cheap cars
Opinion

'The death of cheap cars will be a travesty for personal mobility'

Our appetite for small, cheap cars is as strong as ever - although Mike Rutherford warns they may no longer be profitable
12 Sep 2021
New Toyota RAV4 Adventure heads up 2022 model refresh
Toyota RAV4 Adventure
News

New Toyota RAV4 Adventure heads up 2022 model refresh

The rugged Toyota RAV4 Adventure targets lifestyle buyers with a tough-looking new front bumper and interior tweaks
14 Sep 2021
E10 petrol explained: UK prices, checker tool and is it OK for your car?
Petrol pump
News

E10 petrol explained: UK prices, checker tool and is it OK for your car?

E10 petrol is up to 10 per cent ethanol and is available at UK fuel stations now as part of the bid to cut CO2 emissions
1 Sep 2021