In-depth reviews

Suzuki Swift review - Interior, design and technology

Build quality feels good, but the finish of even higher-spec cars is durable rather than plush

Inside, the swift’s cabin is best described as functional. There’s no soft, squidgy plastics or fancy swooping features here: what there is, is a fairly solid cabin with a neat layout and big, simple controls for the air conditioning system.

Suzuki has revised the trim structure for the Swift, with the cheapest SZ-L model featuring generous levels of kit: 16-inch polished alloy wheels, rear privacy glass, air-con, a DAB radio, Bluetooth and adaptive cruise control.

Mid-spec SZ-T looks the most appealing of the editions, because it brings Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility (so you can use selected apps from your phone, including navigation), along with rear parking sensors and a host of extra safety equipment. SZ5 throws in integrated sat-nav, keyless entry, climate control, electric rear windows and power folding door mirrors.

The interior design is neat, and all of the switches are in sensible positions. However, while there’s no denying that it all feels tightly screwed together, the whole experience is short on flair, with even range-topping versions including swathes of hard, black plastic. Indeed, there are precious few soft-touch materials throughout the cabin; the likes of the Ford Fiesta do a better job of feeling plush in the right areas, and it’s a world behind the SEAT Ibiza in this regard.

The Swift Sport looks the hot hatch part without being garishly attention grabbing - if you don't choose Champion Yellow paint, of course. It gets a honeycomb radiator grille, carbon-fibre effect sills, twin exhausts and a small roof spoiler, plus unique bumpers and sports seats.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

Only the SZ-T and SZ5 trims feature a touchscreen system, while the base SZ-L uses a more old-school head unit with a monochrome LCD screen and chunky buttons. Even though it looks a little dated, it does the job perfectly fine, and features DAB radio and Bluetooth functions.

The built-in interface of the Swift's touchscreen is a little clunky and slow, so you'll probably benefit from using the Android Auto and Apple CarPlay features. The set-up is close to a widescreen layout, however, which means that smartphone apps appear less cramped, while the main menu layout is very simple to understand.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.2 Dualjet 83 12V Hybrid SZ-L 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £14,841

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.2 Dualjet 83 12V Hybrid SZ-L 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £14,841

Fastest

  • Name
    1.4 Boosterjet 48V Hybrid Sport 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £21,892

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