In-depth reviews

Lexus UX review - MPG, CO2 and running costs

Official figures suggest that the UX will be a cheap car to run, irrespective of fuel type

Lexus calls UX 250h models ‘self-charging hybrids’, which means you never need to connect a UX to a charging point. The flip-side is that you shouldn’t expect the same high levels of fuel-efficiency that a plug-in hybrid promises, as the realistic all-electric range is limited to just a couple of miles. 

Official WLTP fuel economy figures are 50.4 to 53.3mpg for front-wheel-drive UX models. The range of values is due to some equipment, such as larger alloy wheels, affecting fuel consumption. As for all-wheel-drive variants, these are claimed to be capable of returning 47.1mpg.

As for emissions, Lexus claims that two-wheel-drive models will emit between 120-128g/km of CO2, while all-wheel-drive versions will produce 136-137g/km. Either way, these figures won't be overly attractive to company car drivers, due to the UX's 29-30 per cent benefit-in-kind tax rate.

Fully-electric models promise to be easier on the wallet in terms of running costs. Lexus claims a range of up to 196 miles is possible for models with 17-inch alloys and 190 miles for those with larger 18-inch wheels. This is made possible thanks to a 54.3kWh Lithium-ion battery pack which supports up to 50kW DC charging. 

Using the maximum power supply possible, zero to 80% charge will take 52 minutes. Using a 6.6kW wall box (which is a fairly common output for domestic wall boxes) to do the same charge takes just over six and a half hours, while a three-pin plug would take nearly fifteen and half hours. 

The charging port itself is a Type 2 number and is located in the same area as a traditional fuel filler cap. While UX 300 e models don’t have any tailpipe emissions, they do come with an efficiency rating. Official figures suggest 3.6 to 3.7 miles per kWh is possible, but factors such as outside temperature will impact this. 

Insurance groups

The overwhelming majority of UX models sit in insurance group 22, 23 or 26. That said, Lexus is yet to confirm which insurance group the UX 300 e will qualify for. Still, the more mature clientele Lexus typically attracts and the number of active and passive safety features included across the range should help keep insurance premiums relatively low.

Depreciation

The entry front-wheel-drive UX model is the strongest performer in terms of residual values, keeping around 60 per cent of its value over a typical three-year/36,000-mile ownership period. In comparison, the expensive Takumi versions retain 49-51 per cent. Four-wheel-drive cars sit at around 51-54 per cent, as does the all-electric 300 e.

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