In-depth reviews

Honda CR-V review - MPG, CO2 and running costs

Even the most efficient CR-V is some way behind the competition, and the lack of a diesel option won’t suit all buyers

The 1.5 VTEC turbo petrol engine in the CR-V is designed with efficiency in mind. But where it performs well in the Civic hatchback, it has to deal with more weight, as well as four-wheel-drive and a CVT transmission in some models, all of which are a further drain on its overall efficiency. After all that, the petrol engine was rated at between 32.5 and 38.2mpg depending on model, meaning it was far from the most efficient petrol SUV. It’s no longer sold new, despite selling quite well.

The CR-V Hybrid performs better, although a WLTP-verified best of 40.9mpg for the 2WD model and 38.7mpg for the four-wheel-drive model isn’t a patch on the most efficient diesels. However, the similarly powerful Hyundai Tucson 2.0 CRDi mild hybrid has a similar quoted economy figure. It is important to note however that official consumption tests work in favour of hybrid vehicles as they allow some of the low-speed running to take place solely on battery power, something which could only happen for a limited distance when used in the real world.

The CR-V Hybrid had previously offered much lower Benefit-in-Kind tax for company car drivers, but its emissions are no longer around 120g/km under the new testing regime; even the most efficient model puts out 151g/km of CO2, rising to 163g/km for top-spec four-wheel drive versions. All models therefore occupy quite high Benefit-in-Kind (BiK) tax bands.

Honda doesn’t give an official figure for the range of the Hybrid version on electric power only, but a battery capacity of 1kWh is relatively small compared to rivals such as the Toyota RAV4, so this range is likely to be quite limited. Really the electric motor is there to supplement the petrol engine, rather than power the CR-V along by itself.

The CR-V Hybrid charges its battery by energy regeneration or via the petrol engine, so cannot be charged by plugging into a charging point.

Insurance groups

Insurance groups for the Honda CR-V range from 22E for the entry-level two-wheel-drive Hybrid  to 24E for the most expensive Hybrid EX model with four-wheel-drive. This is somewhat higher than rivals such as the Skoda Karoq in group 15 and the Peugeot 3008, which goes as low as 11. A wide range of safety systems both standard and available as an option help to keep insurance costs down, however.

Depreciation

Honda residual values are competitive if not exceptional, and the CR-V is expected to have a retained value of 37% after three years. That puts it slightly behind cars like the Volkswagen Tiguan.

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.5 VTEC Turbo S 5dr 2WD
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £26,020

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.5 VTEC Turbo S 5dr 2WD
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £26,020

Fastest

  • Name
    1.5 VTEC Turbo S 5dr 2WD
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £26,020

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