In-depth reviews

Kia EV6 review - Range, charging and running costs

Family buyers that are looking for lower running costs will be impressed with the EV6’s range and overall efficiency

The EV6 range starts from almost £41,000, so there’s no government plug-in car grant available to help reduce the on-the-road cost. Lucky then that the EV6 is an efficient machine; during our own test of the rear-wheel-drive model, over a variety of different roads, we saw an excellent efficiency rate of 4.2 miles per kWh. It means you’ll benefit from 325 miles of real-world driving from a single charge of the 77.4kWh (usable) battery, just 3 miles off Kia’s own WLTP-rated 328-mile figure.

Upgrading to the 321bhp all-wheel-drive car sees official range fall to 314 miles in GT-Line spec and 300 miles if you opt for the GT-Line S, and we wouldn’t expect mixed, real-world driving to come in much below these figures, either, which is particularly reassuring if you use your car regularly on longer journeys.

Another advantage of EV6 ownership is that it’s equipped with ultra-fast charging capability. If you’re able to plug into a 350kW charger, you’ll see a 10 to 80 per cent top-up completed in 18 minutes. Performing the same task at a 50kW charger will take 73 minutes.

Insurance

Insurance premiums for electric cars have often been more expensive than similar combustion-engined models, although recent data suggests that the cost of insuring an EV is becoming more affordable.

The 226bhp EV6 model sits in group 34-35, depending on trim level, while 321bhp all-wheel-drive versions are in group 40. The top-of-the-range 577bhp GT is in group 45.

By comparison, a 254bhp BMW 330i Touring, in Sport Pro specification (priced at around £43,000) is in group 33, which is just about similar to the EV6’s insurance rating, while a fully-loaded 156bhp Nissan Qashqai Tekna+ with four-wheel-drive and mild-hybrid tech is in group 19. It may not sway your intention to go for a battery-powered family car, but the potential extra insurance cost of an EV is worth bearing in mind.

Depreciation 

The EV6’s stylish design, electric powertrain and its relative newness mean that residual values are pretty strong. All models are predicted to hold on to around 59 per cent of their list price over a typical three-year/36,000-mile ownership period. This puts the EV6 slightly ahead of the Hyundai Ioniq 5 on 54-58 per cent, but just behind the Skoda Enyaq, which retains around 60-61 per cent of its original value over three years.

Have you considered?

Kia EV6 review
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