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In-depth reviews

Dacia Jogger - MPG, CO2 and running costs

Low insurance costs and strong residual values will appeal to Dacia Jogger buyers

Overall Auto Express Rating

4.5 out of 5

MPG, CO2 and running costs Rating

4.0 out of 5

Price
£18,255 to £23,970
  • Low price
  • Interior space
  • Holds its value well
  • Limited engine choice
  • Hybrid model has limited towing ability
  • One-star Euro NCAP safety rating
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Model 

MPG

CO2

Insurance group

Jogger 1.0 110 TCe

48.7mpg

130g/km

13

Jogger 1.6 Hybrid 140 Extreme

56.5mpg

112g/km

16

There are two engine options for the Dacia Jogger. The more basic setup uses a 1.0-litre, three-cylinder petrol engine which, although it doesn't feature any of the latest hybrid tech, is still a reasonably efficient performer. Dacia claims it can achieve average fuel economy (on the WLTP combined cycle) of 48.7mpg, which seems pretty realistic as we managed 45.4mpg during our own testing across a variety of in-town, A-road and motorway driving.

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If you want to save on your motoring bills, and are willing to pay a little more for Dacia's versatile hatchback-cum-estate-cum-MPV, then the Jogger Hybrid 140 is the one for you. It's Dacia's first electrified model available in the UK and uses the same full-hybrid system you'll find in the Renault Clio and Captur. It also costs around £3,500 more than the equivalent 1.0-litre petrol version, but the brand claims the hybrid seven-seater can return up to 56.5mpg. Dacia says it can also run in pure-electric mode at speeds of up to 43mph, and that if you’re driving in town, you'll be in EV mode up to 80 per cent of the time.

When we tested the Jogger Hybrid ourselves, we covered a mixture of dual carriageway, country back roads and lots of 30mph villages in the car's ‘Eco’ setting and managed around 50mpg without too much effort. But, based on the amount of time we spent running on battery power alone while pottering around towns, we’ve little doubt those who cover lots of miles in urban areas will see a boost in their average fuel economy.

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The lack of any hybrid assistance for the base Jogger means its petrol engine isn’t able to dip below 130g/km of CO2, so it probably won’t be added to many business fleets. The Hybrid 140 does slightly better, emitting 112g/km of CO2.

Tax

Due to the Jogger’s extremely affordable pricing, no model breaches the £40,000 limit that would require an additional tax surcharge.

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Private buyers will get a small discount going for the Hybrid 140 compared with the petrol version since the former is classed as an alternative fuel vehicle.

Despite having lower emissions, the Hybrid 140 still sits in the 27 per cent Benefit-in-Kind (BiK) band for company car drivers, so if you really want to reduce your tax bill, you’ll need to look at seven-seat versions of the electric Citroen e-Berlingo, Peugeot E-Rifter, or Vauxhall Combo Life Electric.

Insurance 

Insurance ratings for the Jogger start out in group 13 for the entry-level petrol model, while the Jogger Hybrid in top-of-the-range Extreme trim sits in group 16, so premiums shouldn’t be too costly. In comparison, the cheapest Hyundai Santa Fe starts from group 22, while the Kia Sorento starts from group 30.

You can get personalised car insurance quotes fast with our comparison tool powered by Quotezone...

Depreciation

Due, in part, to its relatively low starting price, the Jogger is predicted to be a decent performer on the used market. After an average three-year/36,000-mile ownership period, both the petrol and hybrid versions of the budget seven-seater should hold onto between 49 to 51 per cent of their original value. This means that even if you buy a Jogger Hybrid in range-topping Extreme trim at around £24,000, you should still get back about £12,000 after 36 months of motoring.

To get an accurate valuation on a specific model check out our valuation tool...

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