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Land Rover Discovery Sport review - MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

Despite clever mild hybrid tech, the Discovery Sport is still thirstier than many rivals

When the Discovery Sport first came out, it represented a big step upmarket over the Freelander it replaced. It took a further move in a premium direction in the 2019 round of updates, and that’s reflected in the price. Prices start from just under £32,000, while the range-topping R-Dynamic HSE is knocking on the door of £50,000. On the plus side, you do get plenty of kit for your money.

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In 2019, Land Rover introduced mild hybrid setups to the range, with all but the manual D150 benefitting from the tech. The 48-volt system recovers energy that would otherwise be wasted when decelerating, stores it in a compact lithium-ion battery below the front seats, and deploys up to 140Nm of torque under acceleration to reduce the load on the combustion engine. It works alongside a stop/start system that’s able to switch off the engine below 11mph – allowing a few extra metres of fuel-free coasting. Land Rover reckons that the system boosts fuel efficiency by seven percent.

Despite this, the engines are still towards the thirstier side of the class. Based on the latest WLTP test structure, even the most efficient D150 achieves between 42mpg and 47.8mpg – depending on wheel size – and emits over 140g/km. The D180 achieves 40.4mpg and emits 150g/km, while the D240 is slightly thirstier, achieving 39.6mpg and 168g/km.

The petrols will be quite steep to run, given their fuel usage. The 240 petrol manages 30.5mpg at best in official tests and emits 182g/km, while the lesser 200 petrol improves on these figures by just a fraction of one mile per gallon and a couple of grammes of CO2.

Insurance groups

Insurance groups are between 24 and 40 depending on engine and trim, which puts the Discovery Sport on a par with its main rivals. Good parts availability and top-notch safety features including sophisticated engine immobilising technology keep insurance costs down.

Depreciation

It’s good news for private buyers; our experts have calculated the Land Rover will hold on to between 41 and 51 per cent of its new value after three years. That’s roughly equivalent to the Jaguar F-Pace, BMW X3 and Audi Q5.

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Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    2.0 D150 5dr 2WD [5 Seat]
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £31,310

Most Economical

  • Name
    2.0 D150 5dr 2WD [5 Seat]
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £31,310

Fastest

  • Name
    2.0 P250 S 5dr Auto [5 Seat]
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £40,465
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