Suzuki Vitara review - MPG, CO2 and running costs

Lightweight build and efficient hybrid powertrain make the Vitara an economical crossover.

Overall Auto Express Rating

3.0 out of 5

MPG, CO2 and Running Costs Rating

4.1 out of 5

Price
£22,050 to £28,160
Representative Example - Personal Contract Purchase: Cash Price £10,000.00, Deposit £1500.00, borrowing £8,500.00 over 4 years at 7.4% Representative APR (fixed). 47 monthly payments of £132.04 followed by a final payment of £4127.50. Total cost of credit £1833.38. Total amount payable £11,833.38. Based on 8,000 miles per annum. Excess mileage charges apply if exceeded. Finance subject to status 18+ only.

Prices for the Suzuki Vitara start from not far off £24,000, which is a little high for the small crossover class, while the most expensive 4WD version weighs in at around £27,500.

Because it weighs relatively little (around 1,200kg), the Vitara’s running costs should be among the lowest in the class. Under WLTP testing, CO2 emissions start at 121g/km and rise to 140g/km if you add four-wheel-drive. This equates to a middling benefit-in-kind rate for company car drivers, rising slightly if you opt for a 4x4 model.

These emissions will affect the first year of road tax as part of the Vitara's list price, but as all cars are well below the £40k road tax surcharge limit, it'll cost the slightly discounted yearly rate in road tax from year two onwards.

Fuel economy reaches a claimed maximum of 52.7mpg (Boosterjet mild hybrid) or 53mpg (Full Hybrid) on the combined cycle, while the SZ5 4x4 version is not quite so efficient, delivering 45.4mpg.

Insurance groups

All Vitara models sit in insurance groups 21 or 22, so premiums shouldn't be too expensive.

Depreciation

By fitting even the entry-level models with air-conditioning, Bluetooth, DAB radio and alloys, Suzuki is working hard to improve residual values for when you sell the car on a few years down the line.

The Vitara’s new ‘crossover’ style is more desirable too, so you can expect the car to hold on to more of its original value than the old-school Grand Vitara over the course of three years. Values are in the region of 39-46%, with the entry level car the best of the bunch.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.4 Boosterjet 48V Hybrid SZ4 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £22,050

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.4 Boosterjet 48V Hybrid SZ4 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £22,050

Fastest

  • Name
    1.4 Boosterjet 48V Hybrid SZ4 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £22,050

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