In-depth reviews

Alfa Romeo Giulietta review - Practicality, comfort and boot space

A cramped interior and awkward driving position are the price you pay for that swoopy styling

Interior space wasn't the highest priority when the Alfa Romeo Giulietta was designed, and it shows. Alfas are built for style, not practicality. 

Visibility out of the back is poor because of the tiny rear window and thick Golf-like C pillars. The limited rear view makes parking problematic, although higher spec cars are helped with standard-fit parking sensors. The stylised writing on the sporting dials can also be hard to read at a glance.

The pedals are positioned a little too close together and there's no space to rest your left foot, while the steering wheel is also too far away, resulting in a less than perfect driving position. 

Also, the dashboard layout is muddled and can be difficult to use while on the move – plus the optional sat-nav unit is small and some times hard to read. Storage space is at a premium too, as there's a tiny compartment in the central armrest and only an average-size glove compartment. 

Size

The Giulietta gives a little away in terms of length and width to rivals like the Ford Focus and Vauxhall Astra. It’s 4,351mm long and 1,798mm wide so its dimensions are closer to premium brand alternatives like the Audi A3 and Mercedes A-Class which tend to focus less on practicality. 

Leg room, head room & passenger space

Despite the Giulietta’s five-door layout there's a surprising lack of passenger space and legroom is tight. Rear passengers may also have an uncomfortable time thanks to the reduced headroom that’s a result of the coupe-like styling and swooping roofline. Kids will be OK, as there are Isofix mounting points to accommodate their chairs, and access to the rear bench via the rear doors is good.

Matters don’t improve in the front for adults, unfortunately, because as well as the awkward driving position there’s a cramped feeling cabin.

Boot

You get 350 litres of boot space in the Giulietta which isn't great. There’s also a high load lip that makes putting heavy or bulky items in the luggage bay pretty difficult. Even if you fold down the standard-fit 60:40 split-folding back seats, the boot doesn’t expand that much and the space isn’t that practical. You do get a space-saver spare wheel on all trim levels though, which is better than a can of gunk.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.4 TB Super 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £18,749

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.4 TB Super 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £18,749

Fastest

  • Name
    1.4 TB Super 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £18,749

Most Popular

New 2022 Honda e:NP1 and e:NS1 electric SUVs revealed with 311-mile ranges
Honda e:NP1 - front
Honda

New 2022 Honda e:NP1 and e:NS1 electric SUVs revealed with 311-mile ranges

Duo of new Honda electric SUVs revealed for China, but European spec car could follow
15 Oct 2021
Friends reunited: buying back a Porsche 911
Porsche 911
Porsche 911 Coupe

Friends reunited: buying back a Porsche 911

How perfect timing led a Porsche 911 fanatic to buy back his old car
14 Oct 2021
New Ford Focus unveiled with 2021 facelift and tech updates
Ford Focus ST Line - front
Ford Focus Hatchback

New Ford Focus unveiled with 2021 facelift and tech updates

Ford has given the Focus hatchback a refresh for 2021, with a new design and an improved infotainment suite
14 Oct 2021