Range Rover Evoque review - MPG, CO2 and running costs

Plug-in hybrid tech joins the petrol and diesel Evoque lineup

Regardless of which engine you go for, the Range Rover Evoque boasts good economy and emissions, which should help keep a cap on long-term running costs and company car tax contributions.

Starting with the diesels, the lowest-powered D165 has a quoted WLTP CO2 emissions figure of 169g/km, with average WLTP fuel economy of 43.8mpg. The D200 is slightly less efficient, delivering 43.6mpg and 170g/km.

The petrol models emit more CO2 and return slightly worse fuel economy figures than their diesel counterparts. The lowest-powered P200 emits 202g/km of CO2, with 31.5mpg on average, while stepping to the P250 sees 201g/km of CO2 with economy of 31.6mpg combined.

The hot-hatch-baiting P300 is the biggest polluter of the range with 203g/km of CO2, although fuel economy remains much the same as the other petrols at 31.3mpg on average. 

But, there's also the P300e plug-in hybrid to consider. For just a few hundred pounds more than the P300, the PHEV model is able to travel up to 40 miles on electric charge alone, and reaches a claimed 197.8mpg on the combined cycle.

However, if forced to choose between the fossil fuel alternatives, we’d plump for the D200 diesel, which seems to offer the best trade off between performance, economy and emissions. Opt for the base Evoque trim with this engine and go easy on the options and you should avoid the government’s £325 annual VED surcharge in years two to six of ownership for cars over £40,000.

Insurance groups

The Range Rover Evoque starts in insurance group 26 for the lowest-powered petrol and diesel models, climbing through groups 29 to 39 for the R-Dynamic D180 and HSE P300 models respectively.

By contrast, the BMW X2 starts in group 19 in basic sDrive18i SE form; the sportier sDrive20i M Sport X tops out at group 32 and the performance-orientated X2 M35i’s group 40 rating is just one spot above the sportiest Evoque. The Audi Q3 ranges from group 24 to 36 depending on spec, while the Volvo XC40 sits in groups 22 to 33.

It’s likely that the cachet of that Range Rover badge might have something to do with the Evoque’s higher rating versus its rivals.

Depreciation

Our experts predict that the latest Range Rover Evoque should hold on to around 46 to 54% of its value come trade-in time after three-years and 36,000 miles.

By contrast, the Audi Q3 is predicted to retain around 41 to 48% of its value over the same period, with the smaller Q2 expected to hold on to as much as 53%. The Volvo XC40 is expected to retain a decent 47 to 51% over the same period

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