Honda HR-V review - MPG, CO2 and running costs

The HR-V offers strong real-world economy, but it’s expensive to buy compared with some close rivals

Overall Auto Express Rating

4.0 out of 5

Honda HR-V review - MPG, CO2 and running costs Rating

4.1 out of 5

Price
£27,025 to £31,725
  • Impressive fuel economy
  • Flexible rear space
  • Good build quality
  • Expensive to buy
  • Small boot
  • Noisy under hard acceleration
Representative Example - Personal Contract Purchase: Cash Price £10,000.00, Deposit £1500.00, borrowing £8,500.00 over 4 years at 7.4% Representative APR (fixed). 47 monthly payments of £132.04 followed by a final payment of £4127.50. Total cost of credit £1833.38. Total amount payable £11,833.38. Based on 8,000 miles per annum. Excess mileage charges apply if exceeded. Finance subject to status 18+ only.

Buyers after lower running costs may be drawn to the strong economy figures of plug-in hybrid models - some of which quote more than 200mpg. However, in real-world conditions you would need to ensure the battery is always kept topped up, and mostly undertake shorter journeys in order to achieve such efficiency. 

The self-charging hybrid set-up used by the HR-V means there is no need for plugging in, while the combination of the 1.5-litre petrol engine and two electric motors provides a WLTP-rated combined economy of 52.3mpg. 

Our own test of the HR-V took in lots of less-efficient motorway driving, but with an average of 55.1mpg, we still managed to comfortably beat Honda’s claimed maximum. In comparison, its Renault Captur E-Tech Hybrid rival returned 54.3mpg, while the SEAT Arona (with a standard 1.0-litre turbocharged petrol engine) managed 43.5mpg. We’re confident that the HR-V will easily exceed 60mpg on shorter in-town journeys.

With a starting price of around £29,000 and CO2 emissions of 122g/km, the HR-V won’t be the cheapest company car option. The Renault Captur E-Tech is around £4,000 cheaper to buy, with emissions from 108g/km.

Insurance groups

Arranging insurance cover for the HR-V may prove to be a little more expensive than for some of its close rivals. All HR-V versions fall into groups 30 to 31, depending on specification, which is reasonably high for a small family SUV. Both the 1.0-litre SEAT Arona and Renault Captur E-Tech Hybrid start from insurance group 13, while a 1.0-litre Ford Puma in Titanium specification is in group 11.

Depreciation

Honda is renowned for its reliability, and buyers can be equally reassured by the HR-V’s decent residual values. The entry-level Elegance model is predicted to hold on to a healthy 55 per cent of its original list price over a typical three-year/36,000-mile period of ownership, with the Advance and Advance Style versions on 53 per cent and 50 per cent respectively.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.5 eHEV Elegance 5dr CVT
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £27,025

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.5 eHEV Advance 5dr CVT
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £29,275

Fastest

  • Name
    1.5 eHEV Elegance 5dr CVT
  • Gearbox type
    Auto
  • Price
    £27,025

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