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Range Rover Sport review - MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

The V6 diesel isn’t bad on fuel economy, in contrast to the thirsty petrols. Running costs will still be high, though – it is a Range Rover, after all.

First-generation Range Rover Sport models were very thirsty and this was accepted by owners as a price they had to pay. Things have moved on, though, and the top-selling SDV6 diesel no longer demands you make this compromise.

Given what a large and capable machine it is, claimed fuel economy of 29.0–32mpg (depending on trim choice) is pretty impressive. CO2 emissions still look high at 232–256g/km, though.

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The P400e plug-in hybrid is the most efficient choice. It emits just 74g/km of CO2 and offers a claimed economy of up to 86.9mpg on a combined cycle. You'll need to spend a lot of time in town and be able to keep the battery charged if you want to get anywhere close to that claimed economy in everyday use.

The P400 petrol returns 24.9–27.4mpg on average and emits 234g/km of CO2 – it’s marginally more efficient than the less powerful P300 petrol with its 2.0-litre engine.

The SDV8 isn’t especially efficient – combined fuel economy is quoted at 25.5–27mpg, with CO2 emissions of 275g/km. Predictably, the petrol V8 engines are even worse, with the top-spec SVR averaging just 18.9mpg. CO2 emissions sit at 338g/km.

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Naturally, V8 Range Rover Sports will be expensive to run, but the six-cylinder models won’t be far behind. Tyres, brakes, general servicing – this big SUV has a thirst for all of them and you should budget accordingly, because it’s certainly in another ballpark compared to similarly priced executive saloons.

Insurance groups

Insurance is another significant expense for the Range Rover Sport. It’s a premium, in-demand, highly sought-after machine that’s constructed from aluminium and trimmed to the highest standards: repairing it after an accident won’t be cheap, and insurance premiums reflect this.

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Ratings start expensive and become yet more expensive as you move up the range. The SDV6 starts at insurance group 43, moving up to group 45 for the more bespoke Autobiography Dynamic. The SDV8 models lie in group 47, and the supercharged V8 petrol versions step up to group 49.

It’s perhaps no surprise to find the high-performance SVR sits in the same group 50 rating as supercars and exotic cars: its extra performance, bespoke components and appealing nature ensure it will never be a cost-effective machine to insure.

Depreciation

The Range Rover Sport remains an in-demand machine and, as such, it’s highly prized on the used market. Retained values reflect this, with a generally strong performance across the board.

The SDV6 HSE is the star of the range. After three years and 36,000 miles, it retains around 58 per cent of its initial list price; there’s little difference between five and seven-seat versions, although the HSE Dynamic does knock back retained values a little, to around 56 per cent.

P400e plug-in hybrid models are expected to hold on to around 52 to 56 per cent of their value over the same period, while the most powerful SVR model should retain around 60 per cent. The P400 petrol models each hold on to around 55 to 56 per cent.

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Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    2.0 P300 HSE 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £63,390

Most Economical

  • Name
    2.0 P400e HSE 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £72,915

Fastest

  • Name
    5.0 P575 S/C SVR 5dr Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £99,620
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