Range Rover review - Interior, design and technology

The fifth-generation Range Rover showcases strong design, outstanding levels of luxury and the latest onboard technology

The fifth-generation Range Rover sits on the same MLA-Flex platform as the latest Range Rover Sport model, with the vehicle architecture designed to house hybrid, plug-in hybrid and all-electric powertrains. It’s a strong engine lineup that fits well with the Range Rover’s capable image.

A quick look at the exterior shows that Land Rover has elected to take an evolutionary path with the luxury SUV’s design. Taking in the front three-quarter stance, the standout feature is the simple, minimalist approach running from front to back. The door creases that featured on the previous model have been ironed out, while flush door handles, slimmer headlights and a less fussy front-end add a fresher feel.

It’s at the rear where changes are more noticeable; redesigned lights are now ‘hidden until lit’, which means the traditional cluster sits within a gloss black boot surround, while the indicators are either side of the Range Rover script on the tailgate.

The interior still provides the same imperious driving position, and there’s plenty of onboard technology, such as a 360-degree camera and a digital rear-view mirror, to help provide the best view whether on or off-road. Fit and finish throughout the cabin is outstanding and travelling in the Range Rover feels like a special occasion - more so than when aboard a Bentley Bentayga.

One minor gripe we do have is with the gear selector which feels fine, but can be rather awkward to use. Having to press a button at the back of the lever prior to selecting a gear can be irksome if you’re in a rush, while the selector action is overly sensitive making it more difficult than it should be to find neutral.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

Land Rover’s latest Pivi Pro infotainment system is a great piece of kit that’s easy to use. The large 13.1-inch screen in the Range Rover makes things easy to access, and the home screen is split vertically into three, with navigation, phone and audio settings next to each other. 

Everything works slickly, while a wireless smartphone connection means your device is connected to the system as soon as you climb aboard.

The shortcut keys on either side of the main screen are useful, while a single menu shows every function available, including the set-up of the Terrain Response system, massage seats, cabin air-filtration system and settings for the LED ambient lighting.

Land Rover’s surround view cameras work well, and the high-resolution screen helps you to monitor around the car. This system can be used at speed, but we wouldn’t recommend it, because it’s distracting.

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