In-depth reviews

Volvo XC60 review - Interior, design and technology

Another stunning Volvo interior that’s well-made, looks great and is dominated by a fantastic 9-inch touchscreen

There’s a good reason why the XC60 looks a bit like a smaller XC90; it’s based on the same Scalable Product Architecture (SPA) platform as the seven-seater. It lives up to its name and really is scaled down. It’s easy to see the design similarities as well; the ‘Thor’s Hammer’ headlights, large grille and prominent Volvo badge are all still present.

From an interior design and quality point of view, the XC60 leads the class. This is another stunning Volvo interior, dominated, as usual, by a large nine-inch portrait-oriented touchscreen in the centre of the dash. There's also an impressive 12.3" driver's information display.

Every model gets leather seats, while there’s more leather elsewhere around the cabin and subtle amounts of chrome to lift things. You can choose various finishes, all with a cool Scandinavian feel to them, while the tiny Swedish flag on the driver’s seat is joined by a tiny metallic one just beneath the vent on the passenger’s side – nice details.

The plastics around the cabin all feel really good, too, apart from the lid of the glovebox, which is surprisingly cheap.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment 

The first thing you’ll notice about the Volvo’s infotainment system is the nine-inch tablet-style portrait display. It’s fitted as standard and looks hi-tech, a bit like a tablet that’s been integrated into the car’s dashboard. It operates in the same way, using swipes and light touches just like your smartphone. That’s not always such a good thing in a car, though. 

Touching the screen requires taking your eyes off the road, and while the Volvo’s set-up is more responsive than a Jaguar F-Pace's, it occasionally doesn’t respond to your inputs. Sat-nav, DAB and Bluetooth are standard, but you have to pay extra for smartphone connectivity; it’s £300 in the Volvo, but at least it adds both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, rather than just the latter.

The £2,500 Bowers & Wilkins stereo upgrade is absolutely superb, but it’s very expensive and will only be worth it for those who are serious audiophiles.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    2.0 T4 190 Edition 5dr Geartronic
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £36,600

Most Economical

  • Name
    2.0 T6 RC PHEV Inscription Expression 5dr AWD Auto
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £50,525

Fastest

  • Name
    2.0 T8 405 Hybrid Polestar Engineered 5dr AWD Gtrn
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £63,875

Most Popular

'Just because impressive tech is available, it shouldn’t necessarily be installed in cars'
Opinion tech
Opinion

'Just because impressive tech is available, it shouldn’t necessarily be installed in cars'

Mike Rutherford says designers, car makers and politicians need to consult motorists more often
16 May 2021
New 2021 BMW 2 Series Coupe specs confirmed ahead of summer launch
BMW 2 Series Coupe - exclusive image
BMW 2 Series Coupe

New 2021 BMW 2 Series Coupe specs confirmed ahead of summer launch

The new BMW 2 Series Coupe will be aimed at keen drivers, with the M240i model offering four-wheel drive and a 369bhp straight-six engine. Our exclusi…
17 May 2021
David Brown Automotive unveils Mini Remastered Oselli Edition
David Brown Automotive Oselli Mini - front
MINI

David Brown Automotive unveils Mini Remastered Oselli Edition

123bhp classic Mini restomod has been built with input from race specialists Oselli
17 May 2021