Mercedes C-Class Saloon review

Practical estate version of the stylish Mercedes C-Class.

Overall Auto Express Rating

3.0 out of 5

Price
£37,780 to £51,120
Representative Example - Personal Contract Purchase: Cash Price £10,000.00, Deposit £1500.00, borrowing £8,500.00 over 4 years at 7.4% Representative APR (fixed). 47 monthly payments of £132.04 followed by a final payment of £4127.50. Total cost of credit £1833.38. Total amount payable £11,833.38. Based on 8,000 miles per annum. Excess mileage charges apply if exceeded. Finance subject to status 18+ only.

Driving The estate version of Mercedes' latest C-Class is smooth and comfortable, cruising in near silence with superb ride quality. What’s more, models with optional ‘Advanced Agility’ suspension have a Sport button to firm the suspension and sharpen the gearchange. Accurate handling and perfectly judged steering also mean the C-Class can teach the BMW 3-Series a thing or two about driving dynamics. BMW has the edge with engines, though. Mercedes' popular 2.2-litre diesel has more noise and vibration than the class best, while other V6 petrol and diesel options are very good but not quite class-leading. The seven-speed auto is excellent, while the manual gearbox has is much improved.

Marketplace We reckon the C-Class is easily the most successful of the latest generation Mercedes models. The estate variant has even more to offer than the saloon. Every model has an electric tailgate. Just press a button on the driver’s door, or touch the boot handle, and it opens and closes automatically. A line-up of SE, Elegance and Sport models has a comprehensive engine range, and competes with the BMW 3-Series Touring and Audi A4 Avant – though in terms of equipment and costs, the Merc looks pricey alongside rivals.

Owning The C-Class estate's lengthy body makes way for a generous boot, as do unobtrusive wheelarches, a low load sill and a near-vertical tailgate. Unfortunately, dropping the seats is tricky - the load cover is attached to the seat backs, so even though they’re easy to fold, it’s a heavy operation. Still, the 1,500 litres it yields is impressive – more so than poor legroom in the back. The rear bench is also firm and a little uncomfortable. Things are better up front. The overall ambience is spot-on. The dashboard is well laid out, attractive and robust, and looks expensive even if it doesn’t feel it - the materials aren’t in Audi’s league. You sit a little high, but the driving position is still very comfortable, and gives you a good view out. As usual for Mercedes, retained values for automatic estates will be a few per cent higher than already-impressive values for saloons. Fuel economy can’t match BMW or Audi, and service charges are expensive, but you do benefit from a 30-year recovery deal is desirable.

Engines, performance and drive

0

MPG, CO2 and Running Costs

0

Interior, design and technology

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Practicality, comfort and boot space

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Reliability and Safety

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Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    C200 Sport 4dr 9G-Tronic
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £37,780

Most Economical

  • Name
    C300e AMG Line 4dr 9G-Tronic
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £44,100

Fastest

  • Name
    C300d AMG Line 4dr 9G-Tronic
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £44,920

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