In-depth reviews

Renault Clio review - Interior, design and technology

The Renault Clio’s interior is class-leading, especially in higher trims; strong infotainment also impresses

Renault deliberately took an evolutionary approach to designing the latest Clio – it doesn’t look too different to the previous model, but that’s no bad thing. Sharper design details feature but overall proportions are very similar despite an all-new platform based on the French manufacturer’s CMF-B architecture.

The new platform is claimed to improve the Clio’s safety credentials, efficiency and refinement, while also allowing for the use of more sophisticated technology than its predecessor – not least electrification, as found on the E-Tech version of the Clio.

Those familiar with the old Clio will be most impressed by the latest car’s interior, however. A big step forward has been made in terms of build quality, materials used and – perhaps most importantly in today’s market – infotainment. The car’s dashboard prioritises ergonomics more than ever, with all major controls seemingly raised to fall within easy reach for the driver.

A touchscreen infotainment display – available in two sizes – sits proudly in the centre, canted towards the driver, and is easily reached and operated unlike the equivalents on some rivals. There’s a lot of plastic on show in the car’s interior but the majority of it feels of good quality and it’s all well put-together.

Iconic and SE Edition trims have been discontinued, with Evolution and Techno specifications taking their place in the Clio lineup behind the sporty R.S. Line and Lutecia SE version (hybrid only). Entry-level cars are well-equipped, with 16-inch alloy wheels, LED running lights, cruise control and rear parking sensors all included as standard. Inside the cabin is equally impressive and features a 7-inch touchscreen with integrated sat-nav, climate control and a wireless smartphone charging function.

Upgrading to a Techno version brings bigger 17-inch alloys, chrome exterior trim, front parking sensors and fabric/velvet-trimmed seats, while the sporty R.S. Line features a restyled front bumper, Gun Metal Grey exterior accents, R.S. Line-specific upholstery, a 9.3-inch touchscreen and a 10-inch digital driver's display.

Sat-nav, stereo and infotainment

All models include Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity, although the smaller 7-inch screen isn’t as sharp or responsive as you'll find some rivals such as the Ford Fiesta. It’s still easy and largely intuitive to use – not something that older Renault systems could be praised for. The larger 9.3-inch screen offered on the RS Line trim is much better resolved and is technically superior with much sharper graphics, but we found it intrudes on the driver’s view a little as it pokes above the line of the dash. Either system is a welcome improvement over those fitted to Renaults of old, however.

Next Steps

Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    1.0 SCe 65 Iconic 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £16,520

Most Economical

  • Name
    1.0 SCe 65 Iconic 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £16,520

Fastest

  • Name
    1.0 TCe 90 Iconic 5dr
  • Gearbox type
    Manual
  • Price
    £17,220

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