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In-depth reviews

Porsche 911 review - Practicality, comfort and boot space

The 911’s 2+2 layout means it’s still the most practical sports car on sale

The 911 has grown, so there’s a little more room inside than before, yet it doesn’t feel too much larger to drive thanks to engineers adding even more agility. Parking will be a little trickier maybe due to the wider body, but there are tech options to help you here. 

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Plus, visibility is great – a 911 trait – and with rear-axle steering giving it a relatively small turning circle, it’s still not as intimidating to manoeuvre as something like a Mercedes-AMG GT or Audi R8.

This was always the case, but now there’s more comfort on offer too. The 911 is a better GT car than ever, yet it doesn’t feel like it’s sacrificed its sports car credentials. 

The driving position is great – you can get low behind the wheel without compromising your forward visibility – and there’s plenty of storage. However, the split cup-holders (one behind the gear lever and one by the passenger door) are a retrograde step from the clever solution mounted in the dash of the 991-generation car.

Combined with the respectable efficiency it’s worth mentioning that the 64-litre fuel tank will give the 911 a decent cruising range. As it’s a more accomplished GT car, this will be an important factor for many owners.

Size 

In its evolution to the 992 generation, the 911 has grown. It’s now 20mm longer with an engine that sits further forward, although the wheelbase hasn’t changed. Due to the single body width being offered, the car is also chunkier with wider front and rear tracks.

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Plus, for the first time in a non-GT 911, it uses different sized front and rear wheels. They are 20 inches at the front and 21-inches at the rear - the latter using huge 305-section tyres, which partly explains its great traction. The fact that the 911 rides so well on huge alloys like this is all the more impressive, too.

The 911 always felt like a compact car next to its rivals, and while it might have grown, it’s still no larger than some of the mid-engined competition. In fact, it’s much easier to drive on narrow roads than mid-engined cars like the Audi R8, while its front-engined rival from Mercedes-AMG and the Jaguar F-Type also feel like physically larger cars to drive, yet they’re more cramped inside. 

Leg room, head room & passenger space  

Cabin space in the front is good. There are no complaints here and the ergonomics are fundamentally sound. While Porsche has changed the cabin design, the layout is basically identical. This 911 is actually 4mm taller than its predecessor, so there’s actually a little more headroom too.

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The trademark small rear seats mean this is a sports car that can easily carry a young family if your children are small. Not many rivals can do that.

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There’s not much room in the back for adults, while access isn’t the easiest either, but the seats are fine for short journeys around the corner. The rear berths also double as extra luggage space should you need it but the 911 is actually relatively functional in that regard too.

Boot 

Due to its rear-engined layout, the 911’s luggage space is in the nose – and there’s 132 litres available. This is slightly down on its two-wheel drive predecessor, but what you need to know is that there’s enough space for two bags and a few other items, so weekends away or a small shop won’t be a problem.

Of course, there are always those back seats to use if your bags spill over into the cabin. The back rests can be folded down to create a flat ledge that runs to the base of the tapered rear glass, while the space underneath the folded back rests can be packed with stuff too. Or you can just leave them in place.

The boot itself is easy to load as the nose is low, it’s a regular shape and access is simple. Beyond this, there isn’t much more to tell.

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Which Is Best

Cheapest

  • Name
    2dr PDK
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £82,795

Most Economical

  • Name
    2dr PDK
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £82,795

Fastest

  • Name
    S 2dr PDK
  • Gearbox type
    Semi-auto
  • Price
    £94,350
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